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  • #16
    I would go for the bigger panel even if you have to derate it. I like the simplicity of not having a line side tap but that is not a professional opinion.
    9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

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    • #17
      I ideally want to use the 225 amp panel as well because, if all goes well, I plan to expand the system next year. I need about 15 kW to offset my usage and Duke allows net metering for you to 20 kW, but their rebate is only up to 10 kW. So I’m doing the 10 now and thinking of another 5 next year. I would imagine having line side taps with two arrays wouldn’t be fun.

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      • #18
        @CycloneFW, question did you only pay $10,500 (net) for your 28 panel system? That is an amazing price!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JoeBinotto View Post
          @CycloneFW, question did you only pay $10,500 (net) for your 28 panel system? That is an amazing price!
          Overall, a bit more, but basically yes. $10,750 after the Duke Energy rebate and ITC for the solar itself, but I also had to remove a big tree, trim others, and do a panel upgrade. With everything so far, net is $13,500. But looking at the solar install itself, I've noticed pricing become much more competitive in the past few months. The next best quote was for $14,250 (different local installer) using SunPower panels on a 10.4 kW system. Third best was $15,250 for a 10.08 kW system using REC panels.

          I was very tempted to go with the SunPower system, but as I read this forum, the mantra lately has been that "tier 1 panels are a commodity, don't pay a premium". Hence I saved a few thousand to go with the Solaria panels. Also, the Solaria's are higher rated, so I needed fewer panels now, leaving room on the optimal roof for expansion next year.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CycloneFW View Post
            .......I plan to expand the system next year. I need about 15 kW to offset my usage and Duke allows net metering for you to 20 kW, but their rebate is only up to 10 kW. So I’m doing the 10 now and thinking of another 5 next year.......
            When you say the rebate, do you mean the end of year true up or the month to month crediting of power that you generate?
            Has there been any erosion in the TOU time periods (if you have Time of Use pricing) or other trends that might influence your next phase?

            9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Ampster View Post
              When you say the rebate, do you mean the end of year true up or the month to month crediting of power that you generate?
              Has there been any erosion in the TOU time periods (if you have Time of Use pricing) or other trends that might influence your next phase?
              Install rebate of $0.60 / W up to $6,000 available in 2018 - 2022 for up to a certain dollar amount for all applications of the rebate each year. Expansion of systems is permitted under the rebate terms.

              There is a Time of Use rate schedule. I can switch to, but unless I’m offsetting most of my usage, the demand charges won’t make it be worth it. There is also a Critical Loads rate schedule I could switch to that doesn’t have demand charges, but net metering is not permitted on that plan. Also, the install rebate requires signing up for NM.

              Meanwhile, there is not a true-up with my POCO. May 31st (or the bill a few days later as my meter is usually “read” in the 4th) there is a wipeout of any carryover credits.

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              • #22
                [QUOTE=CycloneFW;n418563]

                Overall, a bit more, but basically yes. $10,750 after the Duke Energy rebate and ITC for the solar itself, but I also had to remove a big tree, trim others, and do a panel upgrade. With everything so far, net is $13,500. But looking at the solar install itself, I've noticed pricing become much more competitive in the past few months. The next best quote was for $14,250 (different local installer) using SunPower panels on a 10.4 kW system. Third best was $15,250 for a 10.08 kW system using REC panels.


                I just installed 16 Solaria PowerXT 365R-PD panels with SE-6000H. Its a 5.8Kw system which will produce ~9800 annual kWh (which is a bit less than yours but I have no shade and live in southern California) for net price of $12,100. I am blown away that you got a cheaper price for 28 panels! Must be the California cost of living! I looked at SunPower too. I decided against them. The Solaria PowerXT are great and look amazing!
                Attached Files

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JoeBinotto View Post
                  I just installed 16 Solaria PowerXT 365R-PD panels with SE-6000H. Its a 5.8Kw system which will produce ~9800 annual kWh (which is a bit less than yours but I have no shade and live in southern California) for net price of $12,100. I am blown away that you got a cheaper price for 28 panels! Must be the California cost of living! I looked at SunPower too. I decided against them. The Solaria PowerXT are great and look amazing!
                  That looks great! Nobody I know has Solaria panels, so I had no local opinions. That said, mine face the backyard, so nobody will see these nice looking panels.

                  Those estimates production numbers look amazing! If I didn’t have so much shade, the expected output (per PVWatts) is around 15k kWh, which would potentially offset everything once net metering and maybe ToU apply. Your system being almost half the size of mine will only roughly a 1k kWh/year difference is great.

                  All the companies I seriously considered have production guarantees, but the one I went with provides either a check for the difference or additional panels to make up for the difference. One of the other two offered such a choice, but the extra panels would be at materials cost vs. no-cost. The panels themselves from wholesalers online don’t seem too bad at $335 each, but if multiple panels would be needed to make up for the difference, that would add up fast.

                  That said, the company doing my install had the most pessimistic production estimates of all, so I doubt I will need to make use on the guarantee.

                  This is the expected layout now. Ignore the conduit comment, they are changing it to be all inside except for that gap between the panels on the main roof.
                  Last edited by CycloneFW; 08-01-2020, 08:51 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Question for everyone. Given that I’m likely to expand on the system next year, I was poking around. I believe I can get another 5 panels on these roofs before I then have to go on the other side and get NE facing panels (these are SW facing). The 5 would be another 1.8 kW nameplate. Should I ask the installer to put in the SE11400H instead of SE10000H so it has more room for the extra panels in a year? I don’t particularly mind oversizing the array to the inverter, especially given my shade, but on the DIY side, the inverters are only about $300 apart in price. Even if they increase my price by $300, would it be worth it to get the larger inverter?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by CycloneFW View Post
                      Question for everyone. Given that I’m likely to expand on the system next year, I was poking around. I believe I can get another 5 panels on these roofs ............ inverters are only about $300 apart in price. Even if they increase my price by $300, would it be worth it to get the larger inverter?
                      If that won't mess with your paperwork with Duke Energy I would go for it. It is a good hedge. If you found that Duke has already approved the inverter size dont worry about it too much. Many of the Solaredge inverters can be run at DC to AC ratios of 1.5 to 1.
                      9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

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