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  • solar_future
    replied
    Tesla idea of getting rid of sales and marketing was a very good one. Customer acquisition costs for most larger solar companies are in the 50 cents a watt range. The wholesale cost of solar panels is now 16 cents a watt and with higher efficiency panels, balance of systems costs is coming down. Battery continue to improve and come down in price. The world is headed for solar power boom.

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  • Ampster
    replied
    No worries @J.P.M.
    No-worries.png

    I enjoy diversity of viewpoints. No need to beat a dead horse, we already know your opinion about Tesla and it can probably be summed up in three words.


    As far as getting paid to put solar on my roof i would take the money. I have sufficient skills installing and overseeing solar installs that I would not turn down the hypothetical that you suggested. It is not likely that that kind of offer will come my way, although I know a guy from Vermont that let them install a Powerwall for free. It is part of an aggregate program sponsored by a utility in Vermont.

    I agree that solar installations are the weakest part of Tesla's business. That should make you feel better.
    Last edited by Ampster; 07-08-2020, 07:22 PM.

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  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by Ampster View Post

    In my mind I could do a lot of therapy for anxiety if they were to pay me. Bring it on.
    That may be because you don't have as much experience in dealing with them (SolarCity/Tesla) as I do with respect to the residential PV end of their business which you've described as being limited to renegotiating a PPA for a relative and some anecdotal stuff about tenants.

    Look Ampster, I'm not trying to pick a fight with you here, but my overall experience with SolarCity/Tesla in their residential PV business including a lot of particulars as I've described them on this forum over the years has made me form the opinion that they are about the most unprofessional and poorly informed solar outfit I've dealt with.

    That opinion has nothing to do with any opinions I may have about their vehicles or Elon Musk. Neither of those subjects has anything to do with this conversation.

    I'm being honest and sincere when I write that if I was looking for a PV system, I wouldn't let them on my property. Same goes for them paying me. IMO only, they're bottom feeders.

    Take what you want of the above. Scrap the rest.
    Last edited by J.P.M.; 07-05-2020, 10:54 AM.

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  • Ampster
    replied
    Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

    I wouldn't be able to afford the anxiety the lack of confidence would incur in me if I somehow were to allow Tesla to put their stuff on my property even if they paid me 30%.
    In my mind I could do a lot of therapy for anxiety if they were to pay me. Bring it on.

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  • PugPower
    replied
    I noticed that on the Tesla residential solar site it does not state what kind of panels and inverters they use. Does the customer get any input as to what equipment they install?

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  • Ampster
    replied
    Originally posted by PugPower View Post

    If things don't go their way soon, the residential solar install division of Telsa will not be around in a couple years.
    That may be true as far as solar installation.
    Tesla, as a publicly traded corporation will be around because of their lead in battery technology and software. I specifically mentioned software because it is what makes my two Teslas run and which I constantly get free over the air updates.

    The key will be if you have the full guarantee of the parent or some subsidiary that they could walk away from. I would also want a name brand inverter and a manufacturers warranty on the panels themselves. I have a steep asphalt shingle roof so I am not concerned about leaks.

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  • Ampster
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post
    For a 30% discount for a product that has a warranty for a major company, I would consider the much cheaper option. In these tough economic times, I am sure a lot of other people will too.
    Yes, i would also do the same. I have been involved in construction most of my life and have done three self installs and three other professional installs. As a result I am confident in my ability to oversee an installer process to ensure quality. I would not advise this for the faint of heart. I would also insist on full access to monitoring.

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  • PugPower
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post
    At $1.40 and $1.5 a watt after tax rebates, many consumers can save a lot of money on their utility bill by installing solar. Of course the utility companies and their pensioners will try discourage residential solar because it cuts into their profits. With a Tesla warranty you know have an large established company standing behind their product, while will many smaller installers you have no idea if they will be in business 10 years later.
    Do a google search on "Tesla Solar Reviews" and then tell me about standing behind your product. Who cares about how much you potentially save if all you have is potential headaches afterwards and little to no customer support? Tesla's residential solar install business is failing , that's why they have to give away the farm to try and attract customers. If things don't go their way soon, the residential solar install division of Telsa will not be around in a couple years.
    Last edited by PugPower; 07-04-2020, 01:25 PM.

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  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post

    I wouldn't be able to sleep at night with a smaller installer. I would have no idea if the installer would go out of business and my warranty would be worthless. Tesla's solar panels have a 25 year warranty. The inverter has a 10 year warranty and Tesla workmanship has a 20 year warranty.
    Opinions vary.

    I'd note that every SolarCity install in my HOA used subcontracted labor with a lot of it looking like it was hanging around the Big Box parking lot a few hours before. Go figure.

    I'd also note, and even though I always get the name of the person I'm speaking with at the start of a conversation, every time I called SolarCity looking for information about a job, I'd never talk to the same person twice. I also usually dealt with SolarCity offices in different states form (so far) CA, NV, OR.

    I also found the folks at SolarCity to be poorly informed and mostly unprofessional. I get the suspicion the place has a real revolving door for employment.

    On the other hand, I've always found that installs done by established, licensed, local electrical contractors who have been around for, say, 10+ years and who have sold/installed PV for, say 5+ yrs. or more seem to do the best work and have competitive prices. For this conversation I'd also note that all of those type vendors seem to all still be in business since 2005, the year I got involved w/my HOA as the guy who reviews and monitors all the PV installs.

    From my experience, I'll take a local, experienced vendor any day. While there's no guarantees in life, and vendor surveillance is still/always necessary by the (home)owner for any PV, I'll take my chances with such a vendor over what I've consistently seen from the big, national outfits.

    One last opinion: Although I'd caution that this is more anecdotal information than researched/verified, seems to me that most of my neighbors who used SolarCity or the two other big, national outfits, Vivant and Sunrun usually cited the size of the outfit among the reasons for their vendor choice. I can also say that the big national outfits didn't charge less/STC W for what seems to be generally mediocre or poor quality work.

    Take what you want of the above. Scrap the rest. Like I wrote, it's all opinion.

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  • SunEagle
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post

    I wouldn't be able to sleep at night with a smaller installer. I would have no idea if the installer would go out of business and my warranty would be worthless. Tesla's solar panels have a 25 year warranty. The inverter has a 10 year warranty and Tesla workmanship has a 20 year warranty.
    That is if the Solar division is still around to provide support after 20 years.

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  • solar_future
    replied
    Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

    I wouldn't be able to afford the anxiety the lack of confidence would incur in me if I somehow were to allow Tesla to put their stuff on my property even if they paid me 30%.
    I wouldn't be able to sleep at night with a smaller installer. I would have no idea if the installer would go out of business and my warranty would be worthless. Tesla's solar panels have a 25 year warranty. The inverter has a 10 year warranty and Tesla workmanship has a 20 year warranty.

    Leave a comment:


  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post
    For a 30% discount for a product that has a warranty for a major company, I would consider the much cheaper option. In these tough economic times, I am sure a lot of other people will too.
    I wouldn't be able to afford the anxiety the lack of confidence would incur in me if I somehow were to allow Tesla to put their stuff on my property even if they paid me 30%.

    Leave a comment:


  • solar_future
    replied
    For a 30% discount for a product that has a warranty for a major company, I would consider the much cheaper option. In these tough economic times, I am sure a lot of other people will too.

    Leave a comment:


  • PugPower
    replied
    Personally I would go with ANY other company over Tesla for a solar install. The cars are fine, but the residential solar install business seems to be a total mess.

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  • SunEagle
    replied
    Originally posted by solar_future View Post
    At $1.40 and $1.5 a watt after tax rebates, many consumers can save a lot of money on their utility bill by installing solar. Of course the utility companies and their pensioners will try discourage residential solar because it cuts into their profits. With a Tesla warranty you know have an large established company standing behind their product, while will many smaller installers you have no idea if they will be in business 10 years later.
    Have you not read about all of the earlier failures that Tesla Solar went through?

    Leave a comment:

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