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  • #16
    Originally posted by rhawkman View Post
    More good advice, thanks.

    LOL @ Rich, did you miss my many times saying I am cheap as can be?
    In that case go to the junk yard and get an old water pump out of a car. Hook a belt and pulley to an old bike up on jacks and peddle your way to heat.
    Kills two birds with one stone and a cheap alternative.
    If you want to see something amusing look at the you tube of Ed Begley Jr making his morning toast.
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    • #17
      Exercise would do me good. Therefore I avoid it at all costs. I have seen that video before. I am not quite as green as him.

      Don't get me wrong, I love the idea. In my dream world I would have a nice stream with about a 20 foot waterfall and I would never think about wind or solar. Couldn't find 40 acres with a house, wooded with stocked ponds AND that on it for less than $75k. Decided I could live without it.

      Oh and couldnt find one in Costa Rica. I bet Sunking would LOVE to have me for a neighbor

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      • #18
        Naptown, I do have to admit, that is one badass pump. I was thinking about finding someone who gave up on a 20 gal aquarium, take the who lot from them and use that pump. Repurpose, beeotch.

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        • #19
          Greenhouse is right to be wary of overcooling the flue gases. Only 60' of 3/8 tubing on the outside of a 6" flue pipe on an air tight stove should be pretty safe though. One suggestion for greater efficiency would be to break up the laminar flow up the flue pipe with the use of a diverter inside the flue pipe like those used in gas water heaters. Laminar flow up the flue allows the hottest gases to flow straight up the middle of the pipe while the cooler air next to the pipe wall will tend to insulate the wall from the hotter interior gasses. Down side of course would be cleaning the thing.
          I like the use of a "hot water dip tube" in the cold water supply to the water heater. It allows maximum hot water stacking in the water heater.
          As a young plumber many, many years ago we heated water with 1" Type K copper coils and a gas or coal fire under it. Water circulated by gravity into the hot water storage tank near the basement ceiling. From there the hot water rose to the attic and circulated by gravity to every fixture and back to the tank. Instant hot water at every faucet and no pumps.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by greenHouse View Post
            One comment about scavenging waste flue gas heat -- beware of flue gas condensation. Burning wood produces large amounts of moisture (hydrocarbons + O2 => CO2 + H2O ...) and you don't want to cool the flue gas below the dew point IN the flue gas stream. That's why super-efficient heaters and the like require double-walled flue pipes -- to prevent additional cooling and condensation.
            What temperature is the dew point.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Johann View Post
              What temperature is the dew point.
              Kind of oversimplifying and not absolutely correct, but the dew point temp. for the water vapor in the flue gas mixture (water vapor being one of the products of combustion) is that temp. of the gas mixture where the water vapor in that mixture just begins to condense. Not usually a good thing unless accommodated for in the design somehow. The H2O can then combine with other gas products and depending on the fuel, air/fuel ratios, and other variables, produce corrosive or generally bad stuff. The dew point temp. is a variable number, depending on the many of the same and more variables mentioned above.

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              • #22
                Keeping the flue temp over 275 F minimizes condensation & creosote formation.

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                • #23
                  I'll have to suggest something to my friend who has a cabin and heats with a wood stove, it sure would save a few hundred over the winter months in electricity!
                  Sounds quite extraordinary. Speaking about wood pellet boilers is the effect the same?
                  I am asking you because wood pellets are becoming extreemely popular judging by offers http://ukrfuel.com/wood-pellets-b327.html

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                  • #24
                    Our woodstove heats water. The heated water circulates through a Thermal-bank under the floor. That also circulates through our radiant heated floor.

                    It allows me to capture more of the heat produced, to store that heat, and to transfer that heat to the rest of the house.



                    I hope to eventually add a Solar-thermal array, and then to begin circulating from it, to our thermal-bank as well.
                    4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

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                    • #25
                      Wood pellet stoves often have a hidden cost - the 300w of 120VAC needed to run the auger, fan and ignition circuits.
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                      • #26
                        Hotwater storage tank

                        Hi there,
                        I recently built a 28x32 garage with in floor heat. What I'm trying to do is find a hotwater tank with a heat exchanger built in. I've got a wood stove in the building which I plan to rob heat off of and fill my tank via thermosyphoning. The infloor would be a closed and seperate loop from the hotwater tank, only pass thru to be heated. If anyone has any useful info for me it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Graham.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Grahamsurette View Post
                          Hi there,
                          I recently built a 28x32 garage with in floor heat. What I'm trying to do is find a hotwater tank with a heat exchanger built in. I've got a wood stove in the building which I plan to rob heat off of and fill my tank via thermosyphoning. The infloor would be a closed and seperate loop from the hotwater tank, only pass thru to be heated. If anyone has any useful info for me it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Graham.
                          The LPG water-heater I have only has the one tank for water. There is no heat exchanger in it, all water going inside gets mixed with all of the other water in it. This is very common among home/apartment heating and domestic hot-water applications in my area.

                          My woodstove also heats water, using a 50' coil of 3/4" copper tubing in the secondary combustion chamber of my woodstove.

                          One in-expensive method of making a heat-exchanger, would be to use a 200-gallon horse trough wrapped with insulation. Drop 50' coils of 3/4" copper tubing in it. Then you would have two separate bodies of water sharing heat with each other. This is what I plan to do when I add an outdoor Solar-Thermal array into my heating system.
                          4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

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                          • #28
                            Hmmm interesting idea with the horse trough, I will do a little research on that. I would think that if both systems were taking from the same body of water it would mess up my thermosyphoning. The reason I want the stove exchanger system geared up like this is in the event of a power failure the thing would keep heating the tank and worse case the circ pump for the floor loop would stop. Thanks again

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Grahamsurette View Post
                              Hmmm interesting idea with the horse trough, I will do a little research on that. I would think that if both systems were taking from the same body of water it would mess up my thermosyphoning. The reason I want the stove exchanger system geared up like this is in the event of a power failure the thing would keep heating the tank and worse case the circ pump for the floor loop would stop. Thanks again
                              I understand.

                              I was a crewman on various nuc subs for 20+ years, so I have seen thermal-syphoning applications at work. Our nuclear power plants are designed to do it [but they call it 'Natural-Convection']. When everything is working feed pumps are running, and when the feed pumps are shut-down the system still continues to do 'Natural-Convection' [though at a slower speed].

                              Unfortunately with my woodstove it was not possible for me to design it for thermal-syphoning. I must use a circulator-pump. My in-floor radiant loop is nearly 1000', simply too long, too much resistance to flow for thermal-syphoning to work well in that application.

                              However my plan for the added Solar-Thermal array, is to design that loop to thermal-syphon [when it's pump is shut-down].

                              I suspect that during start-up, the flow may need the 'encouragement' of a circulator pump. If that makes sense.

                              In our home, we have a Thermal-Bank that we circulate the water through. In the example I used of a horse-trough, if you think of it as being a Thermal-Bank, it is storing the heat for when you need it. Then each individual loop, whether it be a loop from a heating device, or a loop through your floor, each loop can be designed independently in terms of trying to get them into doing the whole thermal-syphoning routine.

                              4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Grahamsurette View Post
                                Hi there,
                                I recently built a 28x32 garage with in floor heat. What I'm trying to do is find a hotwater tank with a heat exchanger built in. I've got a wood stove in the building which I plan to rob heat off of and fill my tank via thermosyphoning. The infloor would be a closed and seperate loop from the hotwater tank, only pass thru to be heated. If anyone has any useful info for me it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Graham.
                                http://www.htproducts.com/superstor-...terheater.html

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