Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How much did I save? How many kWh did we use last month?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How much did I save? How many kWh did we use last month?

    Am I doing this correctly.

    [FONT=courier new]Duke Power Usage 05/21/19 - 06/20/19 = 2038
    Solar created(SolarEdge) 05/21/19 - 06/20/19 = 1540
    Power sent to Duke this month = 245
    Power in reserve at Duke on 05/21/19 = 495
    Power in reserve at Duke on 06/20/19 = Zero[/FONT]

    So as I calculate we used 2038 + 1540 - 245 + 495 = 3828 kWh

    billing wise

    [FONT=courier new]First 1000 Energy Charge 1000 * .07633 = 76.33
    Over 1000 Energy Charge 2828 * .09259 = 261.84
    First 1000 Fuel Charge 1000 * .03698 = 36.98
    Over 1000 Fuel Charge 2828 * .04698 = 132.86
    Asset Securitization Charge 3828 * .00239 = 9.15
    Total 517.15
    Tax about 4.8% 517.15 * 1.048 = $542.22

    without solar my bill would have been $542.22
    with solar it was $170.79 + my loan of $258 = 428.79 (saved $113.43 this month)

    but the "loan" includes more than just PV (new swimming pool pump/solar,etc) of about $50/month so I really saved more like $163 this month.

    Yea, it's was a brutally hot May with little to no rain in FL.[/FONT]

  • #2
    Originally posted by troup1998 View Post
    Am I doing this correctly.

    [FONT=courier new]Duke Power Usage 05/21/19 - 06/20/19 = 2038
    Solar created(SolarEdge) 05/21/19 - 06/20/19 = 1540
    Power sent to Duke this month = 245
    Power in reserve at Duke on 05/21/19 = 495
    Power in reserve at Duke on 06/20/19 = Zero[/FONT]

    So as I calculate we used 2038 + 1540 - 245 + 495 = 3828 kWh

    billing wise

    [FONT=courier new]First 1000 Energy Charge 1000 * .07633 = 76.33
    Over 1000 Energy Charge 2828 * .09259 = 261.84
    First 1000 Fuel Charge 1000 * .03698 = 36.98
    Over 1000 Fuel Charge 2828 * .04698 = 132.86
    Asset Securitization Charge 3828 * .00239 = 9.15
    Total 517.15
    Tax about 4.8% 517.15 * 1.048 = $542.22

    without solar my bill would have been $542.22
    with solar it was $170.79 + my loan of $258 = 428.79 (saved $113.43 this month)

    but the "loan" includes more than just PV (new swimming pool pump/solar,etc) of about $50/month so I really saved more like $163 this month.

    Yea, it's was a brutally hot May with little to no rain in FL.[/FONT]
    well done. There are people posting on here that say solar isn't worth it in Florida because they have small electricity bills.

    Comment


    • #3
      To each their own. I have basically an average monthly bill in Florida of $200 and use less than 1900kWh a month. If I used 3800 kWh and spent over $500 for a bill I could also justify going with a solar pv installation. But again that is me and others may come up with different numbers and justifications.

      Solar is not for everyone. Sometimes conservation is a better way to save money.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SunEagle View Post
        Sometimes conservation is a better way to save money.
        AC in a 3900 sqft home, pool pump running 8+ hours a day + a house full of guests most of May. Before solar (March 2018) our average billing w/Duke Power was $300.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SunEagle View Post
          Solar is not for everyone. Sometimes conservation is a better way to save money.
          I'd go a step further and say that conservation and increased efficiency is almost always a better way to save money. Turning off unneeded loads, adding insulation, changing paint/windows, replacing old appliances etc is almost always the best approach at first. And if that doesn't provide enough savings, and they are in a good area for solar, _then_ solar might make sense. (And it will be cheaper to boot since it doesn't have to offset as much load any more.)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by troup1998 View Post

            AC in a 3900 sqft home, pool pump running 8+ hours a day + a house full of guests most of May. Before solar (March 2018) our average billing w/Duke Power was $300.
            So if your old bill was $300 why would adding solar increase it to $500?

            Comment


            • #7
              we did the following when we installed PV
              1. replaced the pool pump with a variable speed pump
              2. replaced a 16 yr old hot water heater with a heat pump water heater.
              3. added a 'chili pepper' which heats and circulates the water in the pipes so that we don't waste gallons of water waiting for hot water to finally come out.

              Comment


              • #8
                Average billing was ~300. Duke lets you pay the same amount each month changing it slightly every quarter. the $542 estimate was a simulated calculation based on total power used, just to see what the bill would have been w/out PV.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by troup1998 View Post
                  Average billing was ~300. Duke lets you pay the same amount each month changing it slightly every quarter. the $542 estimate was a simulated calculation based on total power used, just to see what the bill would have been w/out PV.
                  I understand. Enjoy your pv system and hopefully Duke won't raise your bill much more.

                  I was with them for about 7 years before moving to Brooksville and getting WREC for my POCO. My bill is about the same but I use more power now due to having multiple sheds with A/C units. I need to find a way to reduce that power consumption and get back down to < 40kWh per day.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We do great in the 7 cooler months, just the brutal summer months running AC constantly runs it up. Wife now works from home so we don't turn it up during the day like we used to.

                    so far this year, Jan - May (5 months), our Duke bill was the minimum connection fee $10.31; so 10.31 * 5 + 170 / 6 = average bill of $36.93 + loan of about $210 = $246/month. From what I can tell, we save a little each month, about $40.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by troup1998 View Post
                      We do great in the 7 cooler months, just the brutal summer months running AC constantly runs it up. Wife now works from home so we don't turn it up during the day like we used to.

                      so far this year, Jan - May (5 months), our Duke bill was the minimum connection fee $10.31; so 10.31 * 5 + 170 / 6 = average bill of $36.93 + loan of about $210 = $246/month. From what I can tell, we save a little each month, about $40.
                      Sounds like you made a good decision going with solar for your home.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here is my usage from last month, with the prices I pay per kWh

                        [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3]Net Usage[/SIZE][/FONT]

                        [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3] Peak -229.227940 kWh @$0.49359 -$113.14[/SIZE][/FONT]
                        [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3] Part Peak -221.223700 kWh @$0.26912 -$59.54[/SIZE][/FONT]
                        [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3] Off Peak 897.480340 kWh @$0.12973 $116.43[/SIZE][/FONT]

                        I received $56.25 credit for 447.03 net used kWh. I love the EV plan for PG&E! I do have to pay $18 for this month in non-bypassable charges, but the credits help me out during the winter. So this month cost me $28 in electricity. In the past for June my electric bill was $450 before solar in EV's. I also spent about $400 in gasoline. My solar covers that $850 typical June cost and I have $56 credit. If you are in with PG&E in California and have a West facing roof, you are truly missing out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jflorey2
                          I'd go a step further and say that conservation and increased efficiency is almost always a better way to save money. Turning off unneeded loads, adding insulation, changing paint/windows, replacing old appliances etc is almost always the best approach at first. And if that doesn't provide enough savings, and they are in a good area for solar, _then_ solar might make sense. (And it will be cheaper to boot since it doesn't have to offset as much load any more.)
                          Sounds good, if time stood still. Works well when building that ideal new house with everything
                          meeting an energy level ideal. BUT here energy conservation improvements have been going
                          on half a lifetime. If I waited till that was finished, I must be dead. Meanwhile no solar benefits.
                          There can be many benefits to buying a not so new property.

                          So instead solar has been watched a long time. When it was ready for prime time, it went in.
                          I benefit from solar energy, starting from the time it was practical. No going years or decades
                          without that benefit. Heating with it has allowed me to have one less utility connected to the
                          place, one less monthly bill with its ever increasing fixed charges before even buying product.

                          Downside, I bought too much solar? Maybe, but here the amount of DIY action has made that
                          error not very costly. Technology has allowed use of excess energy for more comfort.
                          Continuing to work on conservation here. Bruce Roe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bcroe View Post

                            Sounds good, if time stood still. Works well when building that ideal new house with everything
                            meeting an energy level ideal. BUT here energy conservation improvements have been going
                            on half a lifetime. If I waited till that was finished, I must be dead. Meanwhile no solar benefits.
                            There can be many benefits to buying a not so new property.

                            So instead solar has been watched a long time. When it was ready for prime time, it went in.
                            I benefit from solar energy, starting from the time it was practical. No going years or decades
                            without that benefit. Heating with it has allowed me to have one less utility connected to the
                            place, one less monthly bill with its ever increasing fixed charges before even buying product.

                            Downside, I bought too much solar? Maybe, but here the amount of DIY action has made that
                            error not very costly. Technology has allowed use of excess energy for more comfort.
                            Continuing to work on conservation here. Bruce Roe
                            The idea is to make an observation: Too much energy being used for any number of reasons, economic, environmental, whatever. Then, set some goals. If one of them is to lower the long term cost of meeting those energy needs, look around/study/get informed of the available means of accomplishing the lower long term cost goal and find the best long term ways to meet that goal, probably in the order of most long term bang for the buck first while keeping other goals in mind.

                            The way things seem now, and have for some time, is that simply reducing profligate energy use is the single most cost effective measure. After that, conservation measures such as envelope sealing and insulation are usually the next most cost effective measures, probably the lower cost ones like low flow faucets, and LED bulbs first, but not always.

                            Only after all that, and way down the list are things like PV and other active alternate energy measures. The way things are now, the greenwash media and solar peddlers have B.S.'d a solar and energy ignorant public to throw what's probably the most cost ineffective way to reduce a self inflicted high electric bill - PV - before all the other less cost effective measures, which, if done first, will have the synergistic result of making any subsequent PV less expensive as an up front cost.

                            Technology is neutral in its results. It can allow LESS energy, not excess energy to be used to provide more comfort. That it can also be used as a means of more energy waste is more of a comment on human laziness and stupidity.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bcroe View Post

                              Sounds good, if time stood still. Works well when building that ideal new house with everything
                              meeting an energy level ideal. BUT here energy conservation improvements have been going
                              on half a lifetime. If I waited till that was finished, I must be dead. Meanwhile no solar benefits.
                              There can be many benefits to buying a not so new property.
                              No one is proposing "wait forever."

                              Spend money improving efficiency first. Then spend money installing solar, in that order. Doing it in that order maximizes the value of your solar investment. (And in many cases may obviate the need for solar.)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X