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  • heimdm
    replied
    What inverter and panels are you using?

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  • khanh dam
    replied
    you are getting ripped off on the price of solar panels and inverters. I got quoted 24KW worth for 44 cent a watt or about $10,000 last week. Many electrical companies limit production to 10Kw. couple of 10K inverters are about $5,000. glad to see the project coming along, but I would renegotiate those prices. they are already making a killing on the pergola, no need to jack up price of components too.

    "Pergola Structure w/ Solar Racking: 45k
    Inverters: 7k
    Solar Panels: 25-30k
    Electrical Work: 5k"

    Leave a comment:


  • heimdm
    replied
    Sorry for the delay. Next week they are trenching in the utilities between the house and the pergola, along with grading the are and installing the retaining wall. This spring the concrete will poured, single garage built next to the array, and the pergola structure built. In spring/summer, we will finish up the solar commissioning. I had the single line drawing and interconnect request submitted to the electric company. We are waiting to get that approval. If we need to downsize the array we will do that, prior to the work in the spring.

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  • khanh dam
    replied
    so what happened with this project? is it finished? for anyone else thinking of a solar pergola. this racking looks excellent since the channel support the entire solar panel frame. All that is needed is a U channel under neather to hide the pv wires.
    REQUEST A QUOTE - PV RackingGround-Rail-pv-part-206x300.jpg

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  • heimdm
    replied
    I toyed with the idea of creating a slightly raised area and putting a ground mount system in that sunken area and having it basically follow the contour of the ground. If you aren't bound by HoA restrictions, I'd do something like Bruce did.. having a corner lots isn't great for concealing panels.

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  • bcroe
    replied
    Originally posted by heimdm
    My yard has a 5-6 degree slope, so I need to get that leveled and a retaining
    wall. That is 20-30k. (Area to be leveled 35x x 110ft).
    Pergola Structure w/ Solar Racking: 45k
    Inverters: 7k
    Solar Panels: 25-30k
    Electrical Work: 5k
    Garage Next to Array that will house inverters, etc: 10k

    if we concrete under it and make an outdoor space that would add another 20k.
    I suppose a Pergola needs to be level, solar panels certainly do not care. I attached a level
    here to show that the 66 foot array follows the 10% slope of my ground. Others have spent
    huge resources bulldozing ground and building walls, I see it as a waste. Bruce Roe

    TiltPV3.JPG

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  • heimdm
    replied
    Way too much.

    My yard has a 5-6 degree slope, so I need to get that leveled and a retaining wall. That is 20-30k. (Area to be leveled 35x x 110ft).
    Pergola Structure w/ Solar Racking: 45k
    Inverters: 7k
    Solar Panels: 25-30k
    Electrical Work: 5k
    Garage Next to Array that will house inverters, etc: 10k

    I am waiting to find out what Duke will let us interconnect, or what extra charges will be had there.

    if we concrete under it and make an outdoor space that would add another 20k.

    Leave a comment:


  • macaddict
    replied
    Originally posted by heimdm View Post
    A couple of updates on the project:
    1) Building permit is obtained for " 80' x 26' self supporting solar structure with patio underneath"
    2) Our yard has an approximate 5 degree slope to the south. As a result, we will be leveling about 2/5's of an acre, and will require a retaining wall for part of it, as by leveling the ground it will create about 6 foot change is elevation. We have an elevated deck off the first floor, which is about 10ft above the ground because of the slope, and we want to keep the solar panels below the deck. By doing the leveling and excavation it will allow that. That work will begin beginning of November.
    3) Solar support / pergola design was adjusted to the following:
    -> Angle: 15 degrees (compromise between solar production and aesthetics)
    -> South Side Clearance: 8'
    -> North Side Clearance: 14'6"
    4) Next week, I'll be meeting with the electricians to firm up spec's so that the conduit can be installed between the array and the house.

    With the climate in south central Indiana, our hope is to get the excavation work done, conduit in place, footers, and concrete pad poured before winter sets in. That is going to be pushing it. If we get the concrete done before winter that would be ideal, so when the spring rains hit, we are not digging in the ground.
    Just wondering, what is the estimated cost for all of this? I'm playing with the idea of doing something similar and have no idea on the cost.

    Leave a comment:


  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by heimdm View Post
    The deck is like you mentioned a change in elevation, and is about 10ft away from the back of the array. Snow removal would be a bit of a challenge. However, to be honestly, the past 5 years, we haven't got a lot of snow. I think the best thing would be to get on the low side and hit it with a long snow/roof rake, not perfect, but better than nothing. I am also hoping that the 15 degree angle will help the snow slide off a little. We are in south central Indiana.. .about as far south as Cincinnati, Oh.

    Any suggestions how other people do mild to moderate snow removal?
    When I lived in Buffalo (if you can call a winter existence/residence there "living"), I had a low sloped roof section that needed help w/ snow removal. I make a snow brush using a piece of 1/2" thk. plywood X 36" wide X 12" high on a 12 ft. long pole. That was fit for purpose. I might do the same/similar w/an array but put a piece of carpet on one edges attached w/ some velcro.

    Bruce and others have offered comment/devices in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • bob-n
    replied
    My roof is 20 degrees, and snow never stays on the panels. Once there is 2" or more, it falls naturally by its own weight. At 15 degrees, it will still slide off on its own, but might take a little longer.

    Make sure that the panels go right to the bottom edge of the roof. If you put the panels higher, that allows snow to build on the roof below the panels and could prevent smooth slide-off. Also warn people not to park (or stand) under the roof edge during a snow storm. When the snow does decide to slide off, you will get a mini avalanche.

    There are some soft brushes made for clearing snow from panels, but most people don't bother. The sun is at a low angle in winter, so even if 1" of snow stays, there's not much energy to be gained. Never use anything hard (rigid plastic, metal, etc.) to scrape snow off the panels. Even though the glass is tough, it is possible to scratch or fracture it.

    This might be a situation where microinverters are beneficial, because some parts of some panels will get shaded by snow that doesn't want to move. I see that on the edges of my panels in winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • heimdm
    replied
    The deck is like you mentioned a change in elevation, and is about 10ft away from the back of the array. Snow removal would be a bit of a challenge. However, to be honestly, the past 5 years, we haven't got a lot of snow. I think the best thing would be to get on the low side and hit it with a long snow/roof rake, not perfect, but better than nothing. I am also hoping that the 15 degree angle will help the snow slide off a little. We are in south central Indiana.. .about as far south as Cincinnati, Oh.

    Any suggestions how other people do mild to moderate snow removal?

    Leave a comment:


  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by heimdm View Post
    That is a good question. Access to most of the array is open from below. My deck is on the 1st floor, but because it is over a walk-out basement, the deck is above the back of the array. That won't provide great access to the entire array, but would provide a good look at the top of the array.
    "the deck is above the back of the array". Does that mean the deck is (partially) shading the array or simply that the deck is at a higher elevation than the array ?

    Cleaning ? Reads like you might be at least able to hose the array down.
    Snow removal ?

    Leave a comment:


  • heimdm
    replied
    That is a good question. Access to most of the array is open from below. My deck is on the 1st floor, but because it is over a walk-out basement, the deck is above the back of the array. That won't provide great access to the entire array, but would provide a good look at the top of the array.

    Leave a comment:


  • J.P.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by heimdm View Post
    A couple of updates on the project:
    1) Building permit is obtained for " 80' x 26' self supporting solar structure with patio underneath"
    2) Our yard has an approximate 5 degree slope to the south. As a result, we will be leveling about 2/5's of an acre, and will require a retaining wall for part of it, as by leveling the ground it will create about 6 foot change is elevation. We have an elevated deck off the first floor, which is about 10ft above the ground because of the slope, and we want to keep the solar panels below the deck. By doing the leveling and excavation it will allow that. That work will begin beginning of November.
    3) Solar support / pergola design was adjusted to the following:
    -> Angle: 15 degrees (compromise between solar production and aesthetics)
    -> South Side Clearance: 8'
    -> North Side Clearance: 14'6"
    4) Next week, I'll be meeting with the electricians to firm up spec's so that the conduit can be installed between the array and the house.

    With the climate in south central Indiana, our hope is to get the excavation work done, conduit in place, footers, and concrete pad poured before winter sets in. That is going to be pushing it. If we get the concrete done before winter that would be ideal, so when the spring rains hit, we are not digging in the ground.
    Thank you.

    Most peddlers don't mention it, and most owners don't know or think about it, but what design considerations have you made for having access to the array for such things as inspection, maintenance, cleaning and snow removal ?

    Leave a comment:


  • heimdm
    replied
    A couple of updates on the project:
    1) Building permit is obtained for " 80' x 26' self supporting solar structure with patio underneath"
    2) Our yard has an approximate 5 degree slope to the south. As a result, we will be leveling about 2/5's of an acre, and will require a retaining wall for part of it, as by leveling the ground it will create about 6 foot change is elevation. We have an elevated deck off the first floor, which is about 10ft above the ground because of the slope, and we want to keep the solar panels below the deck. By doing the leveling and excavation it will allow that. That work will begin beginning of November.
    3) Solar support / pergola design was adjusted to the following:
    -> Angle: 15 degrees (compromise between solar production and aesthetics)
    -> South Side Clearance: 8'
    -> North Side Clearance: 14'6"
    4) Next week, I'll be meeting with the electricians to firm up spec's so that the conduit can be installed between the array and the house.

    With the climate in south central Indiana, our hope is to get the excavation work done, conduit in place, footers, and concrete pad poured before winter sets in. That is going to be pushing it. If we get the concrete done before winter that would be ideal, so when the spring rains hit, we are not digging in the ground.

    Leave a comment:

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