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Bifacial solar panel pergola

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  • #31
    In a pinch you could use butyl rubber sealant tape under the cap strips.Never gets hard. Would flow with expansion and contraction.
    2.2kw Suntech mono, Classic 200, NEW Trace SW4024

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    • #32
      [U][I][B]
      Do you by any chance know where you can buy these products?
      [/B][/I][/U]
      You call the phone number on the brochure you linked to would be easiest method. google is a waste of time when you can talk to a real human.
      Last edited by khanh dam; 08-20-2019, 06:51 AM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by khanh dam View Post
        interesting gasket product! It is nice to see bifacial prices dropping they used to be 200 to 300% more than standard panels, now they are only about 20% more
        And, based on standard applications and available irradiance and P.O.A. irradiance conditions at the underside of those applications, might well get you about 5-10% more annual production if you're lucky.

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        • #34
          I wonder what kind of power a vertical bifacial East West facing wall would have? vs a standard solar panel facing due south?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by khanh dam View Post
            I wonder what kind of power a vertical bifacial East West facing wall would have? vs a standard solar panel facing due south?
            I was actually just to post that I've read that that's a pretty good installation design; you also get a new peak in generation both early morning and late evening. I don't remember any numbers though comparing it to a south facing setup.

            I'd love to try it...but I don't think that'd fit in the back yard well

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            • #36
              Originally posted by khanh dam View Post
              I wonder what kind of power a vertical bifacial East West facing wall would have? vs a standard solar panel facing due south?
              I'd think that will largely depend on the tilt of the south facing wall.

              After that, three or so PVWatts runs, 1 vertical east, 1 vertical west and 1 at the south array's tilt will provide an est. for rough comparison. The E - W bifacial total will be overestimated because of the elevated operating temp. of the bifacial panel, but it'll probably be a decent 1st approx.

              Or, for more info on basic work relating to bifacial solar applications, see the early work of Shuman at Tacony, PA in the late 19th century. Those early designs used side planar booster mirrors with 2 sided thermal collectors in an E-W axis configuration. Later, more publicized sized versions used parabolic throughs that were shipped to Egypt in 1911 for a solar powered water pumping enterprise. There's not much new under the sun.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

                I'd think that will largely depend on the tilt of the south facing wall.

                After that, three or so PVWatts runs, 1 vertical east, 1 vertical west and 1 at the south array's tilt will provide an est. for rough comparison. The E - W bifacial total will be overestimated because of the elevated operating temp. of the bifacial panel, but it'll probably be a decent 1st approx.
                Good point. I just did that and got 1.078x for the vertical bifacial install versus a due south install with tilt = latitude.

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                • #38
                  jtc: what's your zip ?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post
                    jtc: what's your zip ?
                    29609.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by jtc331 View Post

                      29609.
                      Thank you. I got 1646/1559 kWh/yr. per installed STC kw (however that's figured for bifacials) = ~ 1.06. Close enough for prelim. design work. I didn't do the hourly output and hourly summation of the E-W config. sum, nor any adjust. in the cell temps. for the application, but if a vertical ground mount E-W install using bifacials can be done for ~ = money/maybe a bit more, it may be economically viable, provided the front and back sides have identical cells and structure. I'd still take some time looking at the two sided irradiance and how it might affect cell temps. for the configuration and what that did to annual output before I pulled the trigger on the design.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by jtc331 View Post
                        I've been researching solar pergolas as much as possible, and there are quite a few examples online. The concept at a basic level seems pretty simple and very intriguing, and even has some side benefits (like being able to count the cost of the pergola itself for tax credit purposes since it's effectively serving as the racking for a ground-mount solar array).

                        The one thing I don't feel like I've fully figured out yet though is how people design for rain. Many of the pictures I've seen would seem to obviously imply a structure that's meant to have no water leaking through the top (though it's an outdoor structure, so it's not at the same critical level as it would be on a home roof, for example). Several companies doing custom design even explicitly call out the "roof" being weatherproof.

                        The basic overall idea is using bifacial solar panels on top of a "trellis style" (for lack of a better term; i.e., not something with a traditional roof) wooden pergola structure that would serve dual purpose as both solar generation as well as some shade protection (though the bifacial panels let in some light) and also some cover from precipitation.

                        I suppose the solution might be different between standard framed and frameless panels, and I've been contemplating anything ranging from:[LIST][*]Using some kind of channel system to act as a "gutter" underneath each panel intersection, to[*]Using a UV rated weatherproofing tape to bridge from the panel to the structure, to[*]Using roof-grade rubber to act as a buffer between the panel (either on the side or on the bottom) and the structure, and rely on the clamping to create a seal with that rubber.[/LIST]
                        Does anyone have any ideas on what might work or experience on this kind of project?


                        I too am looking to build a solar bifacial patio from the ground up but am having trouble with planning and finding the appropriate infrastructure/equipment.

                        Have you made any progress as I think we have the same vision/plan?

                        Here's any idea of what I'm going for taken from Lumos solar's website.


                        capture.pdf

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