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  • #16
    Originally posted by inetdog View Post

    Speculate all you want, but the SmartMeters that PG&E uses have a latching mechanical contact disconnect in the meter housing. And they can be remotely turned back on also.
    In the case of a late payment disconnect they just turn it back on.
    If service was actually interrupted as when the building is vacant for awhile, they may choose to have a tech come out to verify the system before they remotely turn the connection back on.

    The contactor is rated for load interruption, but I suspect that it is not tested for very many cycles compared to a circuit breaker or disconnect switch.

    FWIW, and I have never heard of it being done, but theoretically they could program the meter to disconnect when current went above some set time current profile.
    Not fast enough or reliable enough to count as OCPD, but possible to do.
    I read the download on that E350 meter and it did say there were internal 200A, motor driven, cam action disconnects which would turn off the power. So probably a mechanical operation.

    Again while it sounds like there is a set of contacts that would open the circuit I would think they are similar to a solid state relay that you find in places that can handle multiple operations and not worry about arcing or flash over when being opened under load.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sunking View Post
      It is possible for the Multiplier to be set incorrectly. That can work in your favor or against it meaning it reads to low or to high. Easy fix, doe snot even require POCO to come out. In TX a lot of foks filed suit against the POCO because their bills jumped, and they got bit. All their old analog meters were reading low. PUC had the meters tested by a 3rd party and found all the complainers had been getting free power for years and the new meters were spot on.

      As for the Tin Foil Hat folks go the new Meters are no more dangerous than a CDMA Cell Phone as they use a M2M (machine-to-machine) service now provided by Cell Phone companies dirt cheap to generate revenue on outdated 3G CDM and GSM. A 1 second transmission every hour.

      That is not to say there is not evil lurking though. If idiots like Dan have their way it allows big brother to monitor and control your power usage. A hacker can learn when you are home and when you are gone. The biggest SCAM is Time of Day Usage with tiered rates. Nanny states already use it.
      My problem exactly! Georgia Power installed new smart meters (coincidentally?) right after I filled my permits for my 6.6 Kw system Now, as of
      May 15 th, I have to pick a Time of day usage plan with peak/ off peak rates. They offer 7 different plans and I'm lost to try and figure out which plan I should go with! What are the main variables?
      parameters? I should fold into my equation that gives me the best results for me? Any and all thoughts appreciated!!



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      • #18
        Originally posted by TJZJ View Post

        My problem exactly! Georgia Power installed new smart meters (coincidentally?) right after I filled my permits for my 6.6 Kw system Now, as of
        May 15 th, I have to pick a Time of day usage plan with peak/ off peak rates. They offer 7 different plans and I'm lost to try and figure out which plan I should go with! What are the main variables?
        parameters? I should fold into my equation that gives me the best results for me? Any and all thoughts appreciated!!


        Probably should start a new thread about TOU plans as it's not a simple answer, especially not knowing your utilitie's rules and grid-tie agreement. In my case, I generate nearly 100% of my needs so staying on a basic non-TOU plan was by far my best option.
        Dave W. Gilbert AZ
        6.63kW grid-tie owner

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        • #19
          Originally posted by GRickard View Post
          Bruce,
          I thought the same thing. Where would they put a switch capable of that load, right? Try googling "smart meter remote disconnect". It looks like some utilities are already using this.

          Greg
          They cannot. They can either Turn On or Turn Off your service. However if you have a Smart Appliance it can communicate through your house wiring to turn off appliances. It would be the big hitters mainly HVAC. Years ago back in the 80's if you volunteered the POCO would come out to your house, wire up a Radio to yo your HVAC so they could Shut Off your compressor in 15 minute increments fo rload shedding. Now it has evolved into IoT.



          Last edited by solar pete; 04-21-2017, 03:09 AM.
          MSEE, PE

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post
            There IS a standard, it's just ignored. Passing a new law does nothing.
            Which law are you talking about?
            I'm not aware of one that covers $35 wireless routers or IoT modules.
            https://fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/R42114.pdf lists Federal computer security laws,
            and it doesn't mention cheap devices like that as far as I can tell.

            Increasingly it's looking like some combination of market action and regulation is going to be needed, see e.g.
            schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/02/security_and_th.html
            internetsociety.org/blog/tech-matters/2017/02/internet-insecurity-can-industry-solve-it-or-regulation-required
            Applying market forces might help, too, e.g. somehow making insecure devices cost more than relatively secure ones,
            or ISPs charging users a fee if an insecure device is detected. No easy or popular options there, since
            the market just won't care until some really awful event happens.
            17kw. I like science, but I'm no expert.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Sunking View Post
              They cannot. They can either Turn On or Turn Off your service. However if you have a Smart Appliance it can communicate through your house wiring to turn off appliances. It would be the big hitters mainly HVAC. Years ago back in the 80's if you volunteered the POCO would come out to your house, wire up a Radio to yo your HVAC so they could Shut Off your compressor in 15 minute increments fo rload shedding. Now it has evolved into IoT.


              I have that type of load shed equipment on my HVAC system and pool pump. (I also had it on my water heater before I swapped it with a solar thermal system)

              If the POCO needs to shed load, they can turn off those appliances for a brief period of time.

              With that permission I do get a small credit each month and counting the number of times (over the last 10 years) that my appliances were turned off I would say I am way ahead.

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              • #22
                The impact on the public will be different than on me, who buys no electricity (or heating energy). First it seems the
                PoCo is legally bound to maintain the terms of my 20 year grid tie contract. I don't have any appliance new enough
                to be controlled by the meter; anyway when they are short of power is usually when my PV is pounding out 10 times
                what my HVAC would use. Will be watching this. Bruce Roe

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