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  • #16
    The problem with SRECS is political will. My SRECS just went to effectively negative as the utility is taking the credit for unenrolled systems and made sure the carve out for RECs is covered by the freebies

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    • #17
      Originally posted by peakbagger View Post
      The problem with SRECS is political will. My SRECS just went to effectively negative as the utility is taking the credit for unenrolled systems and made sure the carve out for RECs is covered by the freebies
      not sure what you are referring to here. in some states the SRECs transfer to the utility as part of net metering though.
      OutBack FP1 w/ CS6P-250P http://bit.ly/1Sg5VNH

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      • #18
        SREC pricing is generally driven by a carve out in a states renewable portfolio standard. I.E. The state legislates that certain portion of the power produced has to be renewable and carves out a certain sub amount has to be instate PV. Thus the utilities have to buy SREC from in state PV producers. In order to cap the market price of SRECs the legislation normally caps the cost of SRECS by creating an Alternate Compliance Payment (ACP) that the utility can pay to avoid buying SRECS. In NH the utilities have great influence with the PUC. They have convinced the PUC that solar doesn't work in NH so the solar carve out is quite low. Getting a system registered for SRECs is not super friendly and generally the owner has to pay a third party auditor to report the SRECs to the state. The utilities also has convinced the PUC to set the ACP quite low, around $50 per SREC. For a typical small household system most installers skip the hassle and not a lot of homeowners decide to do it themselves. The utility has convinced the PUC that any PV systems that are not enrolled as SREC producers are still contributing renewables into the grid and therefore they take credit for the SRECS that would have been minted if the owners had elected to enroll. The carve out percent out just coincidentally is not a lot more than the "free SRECS" so the remaining actual SREC producers end up auctioning their SRECS into a very weak market and the price goes down. Effectively my fee to my independent auditor to report SRECS is more than the SRECs sell for minus a brokerage fee. Thus there is SREC market in the state per laws passed by the legislature but the regulators has rendered it effectively moot by getting in bed with the utilities.

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