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Average Cost of a Solar Carport (Commercial)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by peakbagger View Post
    Others commented about where it will go. Ground snow loads, soil conditions and wind loading impacts the design significantly. Drainage a is big issue in winter. I saw one popular design that has snow clips on it to reduce snow slides, they equipped it with gutters that appeared to be a flat slope running to common near horizontal leader to a vertical downspout. Might be fine for non freezing climates but a recipe for freezing issues.
    Agreed. Also, poor drainage/slope can lead to other problems such as breeding sites in standing H2O/puddles and other issues.

    All those considerations also add to cost.

    And, after all that, no one on this thread is as yet talking about the fact that panels slapped on a carport roof, or that act somewhat as a roof are probably going how to placed on or close to the horizontal which is, for several reasons, a very poor orientation for PV devices for most locations.

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    • #17
      One good place to look at solar carports is the Cincinnati Zoo. They put in solar carports over their entire parking lot. Pretty cool to see.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by GRickard View Post
        One good place to look at solar carports is the Cincinnati Zoo. They put in solar carports over their entire parking lot. Pretty cool to see.
        Or the San Diego airport. Parking lots and other expansive areas are target rich environments for PV. Usually, or often, public lots such for airports, schools and municipal facilities get PV before non gov. places like Costco parking lots, etc.

        Wonder what that says, if anything, about funding and cost ?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

          Agreed. Also, poor drainage/slope can lead to other problems such as breeding sites in standing H2O/puddles and other issues.

          All those considerations also add to cost.

          And, after all that, no one on this thread is as yet talking about the fact that panels slapped on a carport roof, or that act somewhat as a roof are probably going how to placed on or close to the horizontal which is, for several reasons, a very poor orientation for PV devices for most locations.
          It makes little sense to go less than 5 degrees, 10 is a typical max.

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          • #20
            Funding for municipal stuff is always easier, whereas private business has to have their own funding or someone that does a lease and PPA. Businesses also want a higher rate of return whereas public are happy if they take 15 years to get the money back.

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            • #21
              Lockheed Martin in Oldsmar Florida installed a 2.25mw array over their personnel parking lot back in 2015. It is reported it will save $6.5m over 25 years. I wonder what that cost to install.

              Lockheed

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Skyport View Post

                It makes little sense to go less than 5 degrees, 10 is a typical max.
                Which doesn't do much for output unless in the tropics, and so doesn't do much for cost effectiveness most other places.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by SunEagle View Post
                  Lockheed Martin in Oldsmar Florida installed a 2.25mw array over their personnel parking lot back in 2015. It is reported it will save $6.5m over 25 years. I wonder what that cost to install.

                  Lockheed
                  SWAG's: L-M pays ~ $0.04/kWh for power. Array produces 1400 kWh/yr./STC kW. --->>> 1st yr. savings ~~ $126,000. To save $6.50 million saved over 25 yrs., no inflation/tax breaks/depreciation/annual perform. degradation/maint./etc., means electricity rates need to be expected to increase ~ 5.5%/yr. average/yr. compounded, or about the same as ROI. Maybe they can get it installed for a buck a W. Back of envelope stuff only.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

                    SWAG's: L-M pays ~ $0.04/kWh for power. Array produces 1400 kWh/yr./STC kW. --->>> 1st yr. savings ~~ $126,000. To save $6.50 million saved over 25 yrs., no inflation/tax breaks/depreciation/annual perform. degradation/maint./etc., means electricity rates need to be expected to increase ~ 5.5%/yr. average/yr. compounded, or about the same as ROI. Maybe they can get it installed for a buck a W. Back of envelope stuff only.
                    They are located in Duke Electric territory which surprising has a true Net Metering plan. Cost for a homeowner is around $0.12/kWh so Lockheed should be getting at least that amount for what they send to the grid.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

                      They are located in Duke Electric territory which surprising has a true Net Metering plan. Cost for a homeowner is around $0.12/kWh so Lockheed should be getting at least that amount for what they send to the grid.
                      Usually or at least often, commercial and industrial rates are a whole lot lower than residential rates to the point that I'd guess residential users would be surprised and really pissed off if they knew what the differential was.

                      I used $0.04/kWh as a SWAG of ~~ 1/3 what the residential rates might be, which is about what I've seen from other POCOs in CA and NY. I've no problem believing Duke pays full buck on a net metering schedule, but I'd be surprised if L-M paid rates equal to those of a residential customer.

                      If they did pay $0.12/kWh, that $126,000/yr. SWAG I made would turn in to $378,000/yr or ~ $9.5 million over 25 yrs. as a simple ROI with no adjustment for rate inflation or anything else having to do with valid or GAAP type economic analysis.

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                      • #26
                        Australia has just released its first domestic solar carport kits manufactured by Powershade and available through web.
                        Last edited by Mike90250; 05-18-2018, 12:15 AM. Reason: deleting url

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