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  • #16
    Of course, these systems are very expensive, but have become much cheaper in recent years + with the ionic liquids, the production costs are reduced even further.
    If a sufficient number is ordered then the prices are higher.
    Without strong subsidies here (tax relief, for example) or political increases in the price of electricity (which is what we like to have here), such systems are not interesting.if you don't have your own proper manufacturers, then import them from abroad. I also have an import machine from Germany + cooler from italy.





    first of all what maintenance costs? I have no maintenance costs. Absorption refrigeration systems are very primitive.

    coefficient of performance is somthin of the 90s or 2000`s. We do use since 200er energy efficiency ratio (EER).
    EAW in 98630 Römhild for example in Germany "Li-Br." starting 15 KW ( Prior 5KW) and is selling in projects in Switzerland. Lets stay stay in outdated unity "COP" 0,75. Starting at 172,4 F°Normal
    "COP" for manufacturers at our market + CE at the moment is between 0,7 - 0,83 (Manufacturer Entropie for his very mig unites for example 0,83) on Li-Br. Most prototypes with ionic liquids are between 0.8 and 0.85 " COP" starting between 68° C and 78° C and will start the next 2-5 years.

    I am amazed at the efficiency of "typical" solar collectors in your market of "typical" 65%. Mybe in US you do use another word for "efficiency" ? My collectors from 1999 do have 70% here.
    Optical efficiency: The maximum solar thermal efficiency is achieved when the solar power absorber is at the same temperature as the surroundings. However, 100% efficiency is impossible.
    The efficiency of solar thermal energy usually drops / warmer the absorber is in comparison to the surroundings. With regard to this phenomenon, one speaks of “optical efficiency”. The average solar efficiency here is between 70 and 85 percent. Manufacturers report the values ​​of the optical efficiency for their products, which enables the efficiency of the technical systems to be compared in order to find the optimal solar thermal product. Chinese do it here too.


    In summary, your calculations do not work with our manufacturers and conditions. It looks like you do have completely outdated technology + no suppliers etc.. I recommend an absorption chiller from Germany EWA for example to everyone here in my Canton who owns an normal house + normal payed tax payer job and if he produces enough excess heat energy in the summer ( a lot of sollar collectors).
    This has the advantage that you do not need the ugly "usual" air conditioning systems made in china, you save electricity and money, as well as noise and can at least strongly reduce your income tax burden here. You also protect the environment from unnecessary power plant systems + the escape of climate-damaging gases + does not have to cover solar panels in summer.









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    • #17
      Its always interesting how different parts of the world and regions have different approaches to heating and cooling. Evaporative coolers are popular in the western US due to drier climate while they are non existent in the eastern US where relative humidity tends to be high during hot weather. Local incentives also factor in. I looked for some of the manufacturers you mentioned and didnt find any US distributors. Generally manufacturers follow the money and sell products where they can make money, if they dont, distributors move in. In this case of absorption chillers in the US neither seems to have happened. Therefore its an opportunity for someone to make their next fortune or far more likely that the economics do not work out.

      I will keep an eye out for these smaller capacity units and if and when they become commercially available in the US then its worth considering them in some areas.where the climate lines ups with their benefits. .

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      • #18
        Originally posted by peakbagger View Post
        Its always interesting how different parts of the world and regions have different approaches to heating and cooling. Evaporative coolers are popular in the western US due to drier climate while they are non existent in the eastern US where relative humidity tends to be high during hot weather.
        Yes every area has different needs. Here it seems most advertisements are for
        the oldest, noisiest, least efficient technology, but some change is appearing.

        Here as we today have quite high temps and high humidity, my mini splits are at peak
        efficiency, while being so quiet it is hard to tell when they are even running. Being able
        to heat and cool, I have no need to supplement with gas heat some parts of the year.
        Not even being connected to the gas line saves me not only the energy charges, but
        the very expensive minimum connection fees that keep rising. The electricity comes
        from my PV panels, which do not need to be close (and are 200 meters away).

        The energy systems here have no effect on my income taxes beyond the installation
        year. Bruce Roe

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        • #19
          Solar thermal has become obsolete with the current price of PV panels, heat pump water heaters, and Hyper Heat heat pumps and mini splits. PV is maintenance free, no danger of overheating or freezing, no pump failures, no possibility of leaks and the best part of all is the availability of net metering.
          There is also the option of using air to water heat pumps if radiant heating, and cooling is desired. Solar thermal is no longer a viable option.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LucMan View Post
            Solar thermal has become obsolete with the current price of PV panels, heat pump water heaters, and Hyper Heat heat pumps and mini splits. PV is maintenance free, no danger of overheating or freezing, no pump failures, no possibility of leaks and the best part of all is the availability of net metering.
            There is also the option of using air to water heat pumps if radiant heating, and cooling is desired. Solar thermal is no longer a viable option.
            All that is probably 110 % true for most applications, at least in most of the developed world.

            But the OP seems to be looking for thoughts on ways to avoid overheating with respect to an existing and apparently serviceable solar thermal (space heating ? or perhaps seasonal ?) system.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

              All that is probably 110 % true for most applications, at least in most of the developed world.

              But the OP seems to be looking for thoughts on ways to avoid overheating with respect to an existing and apparently serviceable solar thermal (space heating ? or perhaps seasonal ?) system.
              The best answer I can give to that is to convert to a drain back system, remove the glycol fill with plain water, end of problem.
              Last edited by LucMan; 06-30-2020, 08:01 PM.

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