Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Review - Solar Roof on Roads with Advertisements

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by jflorey2 View Post
    Right, but rural systems typically run at higher distribution voltages (35kV or so.) due to greater distances involved - and rural roads would be a primary target for such projects. And the loads will be distributed as well, so the end of the power line run need only carry the worst case difference between generation and load.

    In large systems like this it would make more economic sense for the inverters to drive to the distribution voltage (~35kV) rather than end customer voltages (240/480V.)
    Maybe. If what you said is true then the POCO's would be jumping through the flaming hoops to build that type of system.

    I would say that both you and I do not have all the data which can be used to calculate the true costs to install and maintain a system as you describe. What might make sense to you may not be financially viable.

    Remember the POCO does not own the roadway, they may lease a section to run their power lines but the real estate and road belongs to the State/County/Municipality/fill in the blank.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by SunEagle View Post
      I would say that both you and I do not have all the data which can be used to calculate the true costs to install and maintain a system as you describe. What might make sense to you may not be financially viable.
      Definitely agreed there. It also adds more unreliable generation to the grid, and we know that POCO's are currently struggling to integrate the large amounts of solar coming on-line even without their own large projects.
      Remember the POCO does not own the roadway, they may lease a section to run their power lines but the real estate and road belongs to the State/County/Municipality/fill in the blank.
      The upside to the state would be reduced road maintenance, reduced salt usage and increased driver safety.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by jflorey2 View Post
        Definitely agreed there. It also adds more unreliable generation to the grid, and we know that POCO's are currently struggling to integrate the large amounts of solar coming on-line even without their own large projects.

        The upside to the state would be reduced road maintenance, reduced salt usage and increased driver safety.
        That would be making the assumption that people would be ok driving for miles under a roof and not see the country side. As well as getting the backing for all of the land owners along the roadway. Also while they may not need salt for the roads who will move all that snow that accumulates on those panels?

        Heck some states can even get the people to agree to using farmland for solar arrays or mountain tops for wind turbines. Even the off shore wind farms have had a major up hill battle getting approved due to the "not in my back yard" attitude of the locals.

        I am sure getting approval for roads covered with solar panels will be a slam dunk especially out in the countryside or rural areas that just love seeing technology near their homes.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by SunEagle View Post
          That would be making the assumption that people would be ok driving for miles under a roof and not see the country side.
          I'm not assuming that at all.

          There's a restaurant down here on the water that has a 40kW array as a shade structure for the deck. They used the Lumos two-sided glass panels so there was still some light coming through. People go there _for_ the view.
          As well as getting the backing for all of the land owners along the roadway.
          Yep. Which is why this is best done in rural areas, where power is distributed at higher voltages and few neighbors care what the road looks like.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by jflorey2 View Post
            I'm not assuming that at all.

            There's a restaurant down here on the water that has a 40kW array as a shade structure for the deck. They used the Lumos two-sided glass panels so there was still some light coming through. People go there _for_ the view.

            Yep. Which is why this is best done in rural areas, where power is distributed at higher voltages and few neighbors care what the road looks like.
            You might be right and that type of installation would be accepted. I actually like those systems that cover parking spaces. It shades the cars yet can produce power for the building or even provide EV charging.

            Unfortunately from what I have read and heard about what a lot of people think about RE it seems to be a hard sell for anyone that pays very little for their electric power.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

              That would be making the assumption that people would be ok driving for miles under a roof and not see the country side. As well as getting the backing for all of the land owners along the roadway
              As Ads will be on side of roads, it'll make roads more happening, & those ads can also be placed at some height on roads, to get the nature view while driving along the road,

              Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

              Also while they may not need salt for the roads who will move all that snow that accumulates on those panels?
              As panels will be fitted at certain angle, so less or no snow will be accumulated on those panels, which i think is not a big issue, as compared to removing snow which covers the entire road.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by erashish14 View Post

                As Ads will be on side of roads, it'll make roads more happening, & those ads can also be placed at some height on roads, to get the nature view while driving along the road,


                As panels will be fitted at certain angle, so less or no snow will be accumulated on those panels, which i think is not a big issue, as compared to removing snow which covers the entire road.
                You first have to get someone to purchase the advertisement to install those signs which a lot of people do not like to see while driving in the country.

                And unless the angle of those panels are very steep, snow will accumulate on them if it is wet which would still require someone or something to remove it to get the power generation going again.

                I don't believe this is financially reasonable in the Northern latitudes with low insulation hours and snow. Maybe in the sunny Southern desert areas but certainly not in any area with the high potential for shade or any type of sun blockage.

                Comment

                Working...
                X