X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Buying New Home

    Will be moving into new hom here in NY in about 3 months. House will be getting new roof. Wondering is solar would be cost savings overall. We plan to install central AC/Heat system and plan on staying there long term.. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mstrlucky74 View Post
    Will be moving into new hom here in NY in about 3 months. House will be getting new roof. Wondering is solar would be cost savings overall. We plan to install central AC/Heat system and plan on staying there long term.. Thanks.
    Depending on many things, including how accurate or detailed you make the economics, and in spite of the hype from peddlers, con men and their greenwash media shills PV may or may not be cost effective for your situation.

    In most cases, PV is best done, if at all, after all the other energy use reduction measures that are, for the most part, more cost effective than adding PV.

    Depending on what part of NY, (city or upstate) you'll be in, utility rates, lifestyle and other factors, PV may/may not be cost effective.

    Depending on the reasons for considering PV, if reducing the long term cost of providing electricity to a residence in the most cost effective ways is one goal, PV is usually not the first/only measure considered and probably not close to the top of the list.

    Doing PV while reroofing may save a few bucks over doing one and then the other, and there may be some other benefits to doing both simultaneously, but I'd not jump on PV without a careful analysis of the economics of PV.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

      Depending on many things, including how accurate or detailed you make the economics, and in spite of the hype from peddlers, con men and their greenwash media shills PV may or may not be cost effective for your situation.

      In most cases, PV is best done, if at all, after all the other energy use reduction measures that are, for the most part, more cost effective than adding PV.

      Depending on what part of NY, (city or upstate) you'll be in, utility rates, lifestyle and other factors, PV may/may not be cost effective.

      Depending on the reasons for considering PV, if reducing the long term cost of providing electricity to a residence in the most cost effective ways is one goal, PV is usually not the first/only measure considered and probably not close to the top of the list.

      Doing PV while reroofing may save a few bucks over doing one and then the other, and there may be some other benefits to doing both simultaneously, but I'd not jump on PV without a careful analysis of the economics of PV.
      Much appreciated. Thank you.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mstrlucky74 View Post
        Will be moving into new hom here in NY in about 3 months. House will be getting new roof. Wondering is solar would be cost savings overall. We plan to install central AC/Heat system and plan on staying there long term.. Thanks.
        You did not say much about your house, but if it were anything like my house you could depreciate the costs of Solar-power against your Income Taxes. 1/7th of the entire expense goes against your annual taxes for seven years. Which makes a huge change to how long it takes for the installation to break even.

        Installing photovoltaic panels at the same time as you are reroofing is a very wise idea.

        My panels are free-standing. But if they were on my house I would try to time the installation along with any roof maintenance.



        4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by organic farmer View Post

          You did not say much about your house, but if it were anything like my house you could depreciate the costs of Solar-power against your Income Taxes. 1/7th of the entire expense goes against your annual taxes for seven years. Which makes a huge change to how long it takes for the installation to break even.
          Your house must be an investment property like one of my houses, or used in a business. That is the only way I have figured out how to deduct some expenses. Even better is the strategy that one tax advisor gave me that some one time capital expenses can be fully deducted under the right circumstances. That even beats taking the ITC depending on your tax rate. Consult a tax advisor first before you rely on the advice of an anonymous poster on the internet.
          9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

          Comment


          • #6
            I am a farmer.

            My house is on my farm.

            I can barely swing a dead cat without hitting a tax write-off.
            4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by organic farmer View Post
              I am a farmer.

              My house is on my farm.

              I can barely swing a dead cat without hitting a tax write-off.
              I like that analogy. I presume you would have deducted the cost of the cat before it died. LOL You have probably also explored the advantages of being on a cash basis.
              Last edited by Ampster; 02-22-2020, 09:11 PM.
              9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by organic farmer View Post

                You did not say much about your house, but if it were anything like my house you could depreciate the costs of Solar-power against your Income Taxes. 1/7th of the entire expense goes against your annual taxes for seven years. Which makes a huge change to how long it takes for the installation to break even.

                Installing photovoltaic panels at the same time as you are reroofing is a very wise idea.

                My panels are free-standing. But if they were on my house I would try to time the installation along with any roof maintenance.
                OF, I'll WARN you again, about using your BUSINESS write off's as an example for HOMEOWNER's.

                THEY ARE NOT the same thing. Homeowners get a 1 time write off of something in the 20% . Business get a very different schedule.

                Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
                || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
                || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

                solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
                gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post
                  .........
                  Homeowners get a 1 time write off of something in the 20%.
                  That is news to me about the 20% homeowners write off. Do you have an example other than interest, property taxes and casualty losses.
                  9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post

                    OF, I'll WARN you again, about using your BUSINESS write off's as an example for HOMEOWNER's.

                    THEY ARE NOT the same thing. Homeowners get a 1 time write off of something in the 20% . Business get a very different schedule.
                    I did not mean to offend you.

                    I do apologize.

                    I think 1/7 is around 14%

                    4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post

                      OF, I'll WARN you again, about using your BUSINESS write off's as an example for HOMEOWNER's.

                      THEY ARE NOT the same thing. Homeowners get a 1 time write off of something in the 20% . Business get a very different schedule.
                      While I agree with your warning to Organic Farmer because he persists in myopically and inconsiderately writing, implying or otherwise and mostly incorrectly thinking that every homeowner can write off just about anything, including rotating, deceased felines for what seems to be no other reason than he believes he can do so, and as much as it surprises me to seemingly be on the same side of the fence as Ampster, I'd like to read more about that 20 % business.

                      Organic Farmer: To be clear, under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, the ITC for most all residential (non business) solar is: 1.) A one time tax credit. 2.) NOT depreciable.
                      Business treatment for alternate energy with respect to taxes is indeed, different.
                      Most folks are not in your situation.

                      Stop spreading what is, for most folks incorrect and so bad information to people who might be as, or more ignorant, about such things than you seem to be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sorry - tax credit not write off. somewhere in the 20% ballpark, it changes lower each year.
                        Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
                        || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
                        || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

                        solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
                        gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My handle here is 'Organic Farmer'. I would have mistakenly assumed that my handle alone would communicate that I am a farmer. I live on a farm. My home is a business. Nearly everything I own is business expenses.

                          I understand that most people in our culture are not farmers. But I did not select to use the handle 'most people'.

                          That fact seems to offend people here.

                          In my post to the OP, I said: "You did not say much about your house, but if it were anything like my house you could depreciate the costs of Solar-power against your Income Taxes...."

                          Note I did not say that most people could depreciate their solar systems. Nowhere did I assume that most people could.

                          Again I do apologize for your misunderstanding.

                          4400w, Midnite Classic 150 charge-controller.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            And now back to the derailed thread . IMHO, ideally you would do the solar research before you buy the house but expect most buy the house and worry about solar afterwards. With that caveat, there are some roofs that just never are going to be suitable for a solar system. You need a roof surface that gets sun from about 8AM to 4 PM most of the year. If there any shadows that are there year round on that roof that you can not eliminate, then that hurts the potential solar output. There are handheld devices and even cellphone aps that reportedly can estimate the potential solar generation. Unfortunately unless you are lucky and there are non profits groups with one, the folks that have the best toys are usually salesman trying to sell you a system. If you do not have good roof surface, you may have flat piece of land with good exposure but its generally tougher as surrounding landscaping usually causes shadows.

                            Assuming you do have good solar potential I agree with JPM not to rush the installation, yes the clock is ticking on the federal tax credit but you have until the next of next year to get reduced credit that will probably be offset by lower equipment cost. . I do encourage you to discuss future solar with your roofer and how you can add it in the near future and still keep the roof warranty. If its agreed to in advance you can probably get an agreement that the roofer will come back for agreed upon price per mounting bracket to install brackets. You may want to buy an extra bundle of matching shingles to store away as manufacturers tend to discontinue shingle lines and colors on occasion.

                            The one thing I strongly suggest is pay extra to have the entire roof that has potential for solar be stripped down to the sheathing and covered with Ice and Water Shield top to bottom, I and lot of others prefer the WR Grace product which is the "standard", There are less expensive products out there with similar names but IMHO to date the ones I have seen are inferior and mostly exist to bump up the contractors profit. Many contractors just cover the valleys and possibly the first six feet of the lower edge of the roof with it due to cost of the product but I am recommending going higher up the roof. Most commercial buildings with shingles go this way, top to bottom. Barring defective shingles, misapplication or a tree landing on the roof you will not have any roof issues for 30 plus years. The shingles effectively become UV protection for the Ice and Water shield and no longer is acting as waterproofing. After you have done an energy audit and implemented the recommendations or at least planned them into the future solar design, any good roofer can install roof mounts on top of the ice and water shield. The Ice and Water shield "self heals" any fastener penetrations and any patches with same product on top of the existing stuff fuses together tenaciously. Good quality shingles remain flexible for several years after installation, someone who knows what they are doing can patch in.

                            The standard caveat applies is that Rarely if ever does any sort of leasing, financing or renting a solar system through a third party seller make sense. The sales folks are generally on commission and their only goal frequently in the solar business is get that commission check and if that means stretching the truth or outright lying they may be rewarded in the short term and long gone before the home owner realizes the deal was stacked against them. An outright purchase of a system is the way to go. Note I also skipped over Tesla Solar roofs and batteries, you should to, They will not sell you a system outright and they are still working out the bugs and costs in the roof design and unless you like being a "guinea pig" and stuck with orphaned technology at some point, run away.

                            BTW, if your house is just not well suited for solar due to orientation or shading, there are concepts in some areas called "community solar", they vary in detail but usually the concept is a group of homeowners join together to build a large solar array in one more ideal location and the owners get credit on their bill for their share of the power produced by the array as though its on their roof. . These are not that popular yet but worth keeping an eye out. These concepts are directly dependent on the folks who are members and the quality of the agreements put in place to govern the long term management of the system. Someone has to manage it and no matter if folks go in with best intentions stuff happens, owners change and there are unplanned for issues that are going to require dealing with.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I also attached a solar panel on the roof of my house and also installed central AC in my house. But my father decided to mortgage our house to buy equity release as he thought it will be helpful for his retirement time. But I do not agree with his decision. Can anyone tell me what should I do?
                              Last edited by Mike90250; 03-13-2020, 05:49 AM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X