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newbie question - a 5.88 kw palen can produce how much kwh

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  • newbie question - a 5.88 kw palen can produce how much kwh

    Hi, i am not sure if i am asking this correctly but i will be taking over a lease with 28 REC210AE-US panels that produce 5.88 kw. How much power does all 28 panels produce in an hour. I am totally lost if this is just enough or too much electricity for us. The place is in los angeles, it house is 1430 square feet and has a pool.

  • #2
    Originally posted by beme View Post
    Hi, i am not sure if i am asking this correctly but i will be taking over a lease with 28 REC210AE-US panels that produce 5.88 kw. How much power does all 28 panels produce in an hour. I am totally lost if this is just enough or too much electricity for us. The place is in los angeles, it house is 1430 square feet and has a pool.
    5.88 kW is the array size. That is 28, 210 Watt panels = 5,880 Watts. The 210 Watts is the S.T.C. rating of the panels under Standard Test Conditions. Panels will usually produce less than their rated power for a lot of reasons. This is normal. Back of the envelope stuff : In/around L.A., a reasonably oriented array with not much shade may produce something like 1,500 to 1,600 kWh/yr. per installed kW. Sooo... 5.88 kW X, say, 1550kWh/yr. ~ = 9,000 to 9,200 kWh/yr., VERY approximately. Buy a solar for dummies book or download an older version free on the net. Well worth the investment. After that run something called PVWatts, also on the net. Read the help/info screens BEFORE you make any runs. Welcome to the neighborhood.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post
      5.88 kW is the array size. That is 28, 210 Watt panels = 5,880 Watts. The 210 Watts is the S.T.C. rating of the panels under Standard Test Conditions. Panels will usually produce less than their rated power for a lot of reasons. This is normal. Back of the envelope stuff : In/around L.A., a reasonably oriented array with not much shade may produce something like 1,500 to 1,600 kWh/yr. per installed kW. Sooo... 5.88 kW X, say, 1550kWh/yr. ~ = 9,000 to 9,200 kWh/yr., VERY approximately. Buy a solar for dummies book or download an older version free on the net. Well worth the investment. After that run something called PVWatts, also on the net. Read the help/info screens BEFORE you make any runs. Welcome to the neighborhood.
      +1

      Use the free PVwatts calculator on the net. Fun, free, and easy to use but don't take it as gospel - only a rough guide. My 9.23kW system (finally) goes up this month and though PVwatts says my system "should" produce 11,218 kWh, my installer says we should only expect around 9,000. I'm not really sure why he's being so conservative but time will tell...better to underpromise & overdeliver I suppose. As you learn more about solar, you may pay more attention to your own power consumption (at least I have). We reduced our last month's bill by over 1000kWh (from July 2014) by getting our A/C serviced, and by raising the house temp from 72 to 76 degrees so A/C doesn't have to run as often. Changing all of our lights to LED probably helped too.
      oilerlord's 9.23kW Plant

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      • #4
        Originally posted by oilerlord View Post
        +1 Use the free PVwatts calculator on the net. Fun, free, and easy to use but don't take it as gospel - only a rough guide. My 9.23kW system (finally) goes up this month and though PVwatts says my system "should" produce 11,218 kWh, my installer says we should only expect around 9,000. I'm not really sure why he's being so conservative but time will tell...better to underpromise & overdeliver I suppose. As you learn more about solar, you may pay more attention to your own power consumption (at least I have). We reduced our last month's bill by over 1000kWh (from July 2014) by getting our A/C serviced, and by raising the house temp from 72 to 76 degrees so A/C doesn't have to run as often. Changing all of our lights to LED probably helped too.
        Congrats on finding the worth of conservation. Bet that the cost of the conservation was a lot less than what the cost of the PV to produce as much as the power not used. PVWatts is probably still more conservative than you may think. The vendor gave you a very conservative # for annual productionbecause, 1.) Like most folks, you didn't know enough of the story when you started to know better, 2.) No salesperson ever got fired for oversizing because 3.) Solar vendors make money putting their equipment on customer's property, not saving those customers the most money over the long haul. It's not evil. It's just business.

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