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  • Microinverters risk sun damage?

    Hi all,

    I was told by a sunpower sales agent that panels with microinverters may get sun damage in regions like south Texas (El Paso area) where the sun rays are so strong. He suggests a string system with the inverter in the shade for maximum efficiency. There is absolutely no shade on the south face of our roof, so that is not an issue. What do you think?

    I am considering a non-sunpower system that uses microinverters, which is a bit less expensive.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    The sales agent was a retard? Did he drool and slobber?

    You do not want to deal with that type - he is either stupid or trying to hustle you.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    • #3
      Originally posted by archsteve View Post
      Hi all,

      I was told by a sunpower sales agent that panels with microinverters may get sun damage in regions like south Texas (El Paso area) where the sun rays are so strong. He suggests a string system with the inverter in the shade for maximum efficiency. There is absolutely no shade on the south face of our roof, so that is not an issue. What do you think?

      I am considering a non-sunpower system that uses microinverters, which is a bit less expensive.

      Thanks!
      It's not the sun really more the heating although microinverters are mounted behind the panel so will not be exposed to full sun and the more extreme heating that would result. If as you say, there is absolutely no shading issue, then I suspect that if you replaced the micros in your non-Sunpower system with a string inverter, you'd save even more money. One thing to consider is what happens if something goes wrong and an inverter fails within the warranty period. While the replacement part may not cost you anything, who pays for someone to retrieve it from the roof vs a wall-mounted string inverter? That should all be spelled out as part of your warranty.

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      • #4
        The biggest reason is the high power like the 345's aren't compatible with micros that I have come across. The voltage on them is too high
        NABCEP certified Technical Sales Professional

        [URL="http://www.solarpaneltalk.com/showthread.php?5334-Solar-Off-Grid-Battery-Design"]http://www.solarpaneltalk.com/showth...Battery-Design[/URL]

        [URL]http://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-calculator.html[/URL] (Voltage drop Calculator among others)

        [URL="http://www.gaisma.com"]www.gaisma.com[/URL]

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Naptown View Post
          The biggest reason is the high power like the 345's aren't compatible with micros that I have come across. The voltage on them is too high
          But if they get realllly hot the voltage goes down.....
          SunnyBoy 3000 US, 18 BP Solar 175B panels.

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          • #6
            Very true. If on the moon, I am sure they would work well during the hot daytime except for sun-rise when they are 150*F below zero and voltage spikes.

            Someday, someone will build a high voltage micro to support up to 350W modules. As efficiencies grow, it'll be necessary.

            But many people who buy micros really don't need them - they like the individuality of looking at per-module graphs and finding a module is off by a watt or three. With clear sky an no shading, I don't see why micros would be chosen over a good string inverter.

            Someone (not here) with micros was touting that they got much better output on cloudy days due to the micro inverters. I doubt that, however. Might have been told that by the Enphase rep. The cost of a micro-based system is usually more than one with good string inverters. I wonder if they recoup the extra costs with more output?
            PowerOne 3.6 x 2, 32 SolarWorld 255W mono

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            • #7
              Yes Enphase cost more.
              Standard warranty on string is 10 years Enphase is 25.
              Add in the cost of an inverter replacement down the road and reduce the added cost of Enphase by the 30% federal credit and Enphase wins.
              Yes harvest will be higher on Enphase. This is due to a higher derate as module mismatch etc are eliminated.
              When I say Enphase Iean micros in general.
              Who will be around in 25 years is anyone's guess.
              NABCEP certified Technical Sales Professional

              [URL="http://www.solarpaneltalk.com/showthread.php?5334-Solar-Off-Grid-Battery-Design"]http://www.solarpaneltalk.com/showth...Battery-Design[/URL]

              [URL]http://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-calculator.html[/URL] (Voltage drop Calculator among others)

              [URL="http://www.gaisma.com"]www.gaisma.com[/URL]

              Comment

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