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  • #16
    Howdy Apellidos, I think you need to hire a company that can do the job, I am available to do the consultancy work

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    • #17
      Originally posted by solar pete View Post
      Howdy Apellidos, I think you need to hire a company that can do the job, [U]I am available to do the consultancy work[/U]
      [FONT=comic sans ms][COLOR=#B22222]Spammer! [/COLOR][/FONT]
      SunnyBoy 3000 US, 18 BP Solar 175B panels.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Apellidos View Post

        I comprehend what you said and I totally agree with your second paragraph, and it is the reason why I am questioning my continuity in this company where I just can learn by my own, because there are no technical experienced employees, When I asked about books or courses, it is because I need foundations and it is not easy to find information about large-scale plants, maybe a should focus directly in electricity.

        I don't regret about my initial post, But they shouldn't fire me, I should quit.
        Good choice on seeking a better future in a different venue, especially when (I'm assuming) you're young. I suspect many folks have a poor company choice in their past. I [U]did[/U]. Welcome to the club.

        As for regrets about what sounds like a bad choice you might have made: Own the error, learn from it, don't repeat the same mistakes that got you there, and move on.

        Get your basic engineering principles and knowledge down cold and firm (if engineering is your choice). Then, as you begin a working career, pick good mentors, listen, observe and learn from them and others, and start to get a real education while starting to contribute.

        If you stay curious, passionate and persistent about your profession, and absolutely driven to get it safe and right, you'll be fine. If so, someday, you'll be able to pay it forward.

        Good luck.
        Last edited by J.P.M.; 11-10-2016, 06:23 PM. Reason: Changed do to did. k

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post
          As for regrets about what sounds like a bad choice you might have made: Own the error, learn from it, don't repeat the same mistakes that got you there, and move on.
          +1 JPM. Owning your own problems and taking responsibility are values lost in the USA. It is some one else fault, I am just a victim, so give me money and respect.
          MSEE, PE

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          • #20
            [B]Apellidos [/B]I am glad you got the message we are expressing. Solar Power Technology is no different from any other engineering discipline, you cannot just be thrown into it and expect results. If you are young just recently out of school, you have only taken the first step in your education. You have only qualified to move on to the phase and it never ends, learning how to actually do something.School just gave you the tools you need to learn and understand what is ahead of you. You do not come out of school and build a power plant. For the first 3 to 5 years you are a Goffer. That means doing all the stuff your mentors hate like calculations, material list, drawings. Once you show ability and passion, then you will be assinged specific project task once your mentors are confident in your ability. Learn how to be a bit of a PIA sticking your nose into what your peers are doing and why they do it that way.

            There are no books to walk you thru a design process. Every design is unique.

            Here is my best advice to you or anyone. To be successful is not easy, it requires you to be self-disciplined, responsible, passionate, and tireless. But there is the secret. It does not matter what you do for a living. Whatever you choose it must be something you are extremely passionate about and enjoy doing 6 days a week, 12 hours a day. You would do it even if you are not paid.

            My dad once told me: "[I]The difference between a Poor Man and Rich Man is a Poor Man plans how to spend his paycheck on the weekend, and a Rich Man plans for children's retirement[/I]".
            Last edited by Sunking; 11-10-2016, 04:41 PM.
            MSEE, PE

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Sunking View Post
              [B]Apellidos [/B]I am glad you got the message we are expressing. Solar Power Technology is no different from any other engineering discipline, you cannot just be thrown into it and expect results. If you are young just recently out of school, you have only taken the first step in your education. You have only qualified to move on to the phase and it never ends, learning how to actually do something.School just gave you the tools you need to learn and understand what is ahead of you. You do not come out of school and build a power plant. For the first 3 to 5 years you are a Goffer. That means doing all the stuff your mentors hate like calculations, material list, drawings. Once you show ability and passion, then you will be assinged specific project task once your mentors are confident in your ability. Learn how to be a bit of a PIA sticking your nose into what your peers are doing and why they do it that way.

              There are no books to walk you thru a design process. Every design is unique.

              Here is my best advice to you or anyone. To be successful is not easy, it requires you to be self-disciplined, responsible, passionate, and tireless. But there is the secret. It does not matter what you do for a living. Whatever you choose it must be something you are extremely passionate about and enjoy doing 6 days a week, 12 hours a day. You would do it even if you are not paid.

              My dad once told me: "[I]The difference between a Poor Man and Rich Man is a Poor Man plans how to spend his paycheck on the weekend, and a Rich Man plans for children's retirement[/I]".
              FWIW, S.K. & I seem to have had similar experiences in different engineering disciplines, which surprises me not at all. I'd only add - as S.K. may well be implying - pursue professional registration and licensure ( A "P.E." license). You will not regret it.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Sunking View Post
                [B]Apellidos [/B]

                Here is my best advice to you or anyone. To be successful is not easy, it requires you to be self-disciplined, responsible, passionate, and tireless. But there is the secret. It does not matter what you do for a living. Whatever you choose it must be something you are extremely passionate about and enjoy doing 6 days a week, 12 hours a day. You would do it even if you are not paid.
                Yes, the key is to be passionate about your work, since we are going to spent 30% of our life on it. But just a few people achieve that.

                Thanks to those who shared their experience.

                I am not as young as you think, my last twenties, and I feel the rush to settle definetely in a specific engineering field. My little experience is in HVAC installations, however the energy engineering is what fascinates me. Without experience in this field is tought to get in, I got hired in this company recently and I tougth that it was a great opportunity for me, because they match sustainable opportunities with technology suppliers. But if I don't have direct contact with the technology suppliers (workshops, training...) my learning is going to be a path of stones.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Apellidos View Post
                  Yes, the key is to be passionate about your work, since we are going to spent 30% of our life on it. But just a few people achieve that.
                  That is the difference between wealth and poverty. Most the population default choice is to be poor and no motivation to change. They prefer to play the role of victim and blame someone else for their trouble.

                  [/QUOTE]
                  MSEE, PE

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Apellidos View Post

                    Yes, the key is to be passionate about your work, since we are going to spent 30% of our life on it. But just a few people achieve that.

                    Thanks to those who shared their experience.

                    I am not as young as you think, my last twenties, and I feel the rush to settle definetely in a specific engineering field. My little experience is in HVAC installations, however the energy engineering is what fascinates me. Without experience in this field is tought to get in, I got hired in this company recently and I tougth that it was a great opportunity for me, because they match sustainable opportunities with technology suppliers. But if I don't have direct contact with the technology suppliers (workshops, training...) my learning is going to be a path of stones.
                    Don't be rushed. It ain't a race. Your training will be what you make it. You will get out of it what you put into it. You're driving the bus on that one. Anyway, and FWIW, the way I see it, you're not as old as you may think. I was 29 when I actually returned to school to pursue another degree (BSME) after being a peddler for ~ 8 yrs. + 2yrs. transferring my work and accounts to others after school started. Long, boring story, but I didn't worry about rushing it as much as much as getting it right, and above all, learning to think and see the world as an engineer thinks and sees the world.



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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by J.P.M. View Post

                      FWIW, S.K. & I seem to have had similar experiences in different engineering disciplines, which surprises me not at all. I'd only add - as S.K. may well be implying - pursue professional registration and licensure ( A "P.E." license). You will not regret it.
                      No you wil not regret it, that is where the real money is in engineering.

                      What stuns me is young engineers today think a PE is worthless, that no companies require a PE. In some disciplines that maybe true. Example i work a lot in telecom, and many of the so called engineers would gain nothing with a PE. Heck no work to even qualify for application. That is when I remind them they are nothing more than a Technical Writer or a Purchase Agent buying technical equipment. Most Telecom and even in Utility Power, the companies do not actually do the engineering anymore. Today utilities Farm out the work to AE firms like mine who have the PE's with the Stamps and experience to get the job done. The so called engineers just write the RFQ and award contracts. Guess what that is? A Technical Writer and Purchase Agent. Not a single one of them are qualified to build anything that requires certification. They will never build power plants. buildings, dams, roads, infrastructure, water plants, steam plants, furnaces, boilers, and the list goes on. They wer never motivated to do more and become licensed.

                      It is kind of funny. When I got laid off from Worldcom back in 2003 and started my own company, I turned right around and still did work for my old boss as a contract engineer. I know what he makes and the kids under him. He makes roughly $100K/year. My employees make quite a bit more than that. As for me, I do not have a salary or make a wage. I get whatever Is left over. Thus I pay no income tax.
                      Last edited by Sunking; 11-11-2016, 12:07 PM.
                      MSEE, PE

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Sunking View Post
                        No you wil not regret it, that is where the real money is in engineering.
                        I also found it to be more satisfying in terms of personal satisfaction. Nothing quite like standing on/next to a large or complicated system or piece of equipment you designed or had responsible charge for when it's operating as designed ([FONT=comic sans ms]especially if it makes a lot of noise and you can feel the ground shake under [/FONT][U]it[/U]. )

                        Mostly in agreement with your comments about priorities/capabilities or what passes for engineering. I guess it ain't my world any more.

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                        • #27
                          Wow, most of these posts sound like a debate for President of the United States.

                          I only saw one real question in the original post;
                          "My main concern is how it is the connection of 50 inverters in a single transformer of 1250 kVA. Could you explain me that?."

                          This would be done with large 230VAC 3ph panel boards and/or motor control center.
                          At the Energy Firm I work for, we see many projects using multiple generators (solar or otherwise) at developing countries. Usually for flexibility reasons or maintenance downtime; capacity.

                          A large inverter, when turned off prevents ALL generation, many smaller ones alleviates the problem.
                          e.g we designed a power plant with 40 diesel generators for Chile. THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAY RGHT

                          Your multiple inverters would feed a panelbard, or many, then combine and cascade up to a motor control center.
                          This intermediate stage would most likely always have the breakers closed-in, then using the startup and synchronizing with the inverters to get the system online or off line.

                          20KW @230 3ph is around 50 amps.
                          You could run 25 inverters to a panelboard, 25 inverters to a second panel board, leave room for spare breakers.
                          Send the output to a motor control center (MCC) rated for 1250KVA, then bus bar connections to transformer.
                          You may find that you need 6 breakers in the MCC, and 6 panelboard when you do the math.

                          Dennis Schller P.E.
                          Dennis
                          SE5000 18 each SW185

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by dennis461 View Post
                            Wow, most of these posts sound like a debate for President of the United States.

                            I only saw one real question in the original post;
                            "My main concern is how it is the connection of 50 inverters in a single transformer of 1250 kVA. Could you explain me that?."

                            This would be done with large 230VAC 3ph panel boards and/or motor control center.
                            At the Energy Firm I work for, we see many projects using multiple generators (solar or otherwise) at developing countries. Usually for flexibility reasons or maintenance downtime; capacity.

                            A large inverter, when turned off prevents ALL generation, many smaller ones alleviates the problem.
                            e.g we designed a power plant with 40 diesel generators for Chile. THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAY RGHT

                            Your multiple inverters would feed a panelbard, or many, then combine and cascade up to a motor control center.
                            This intermediate stage would most likely always have the breakers closed-in, then using the startup and synchronizing with the inverters to get the system online or off line.

                            20KW @230 3ph is around 50 amps.
                            You could run 25 inverters to a panelboard, 25 inverters to a second panel board, leave room for spare breakers.
                            Send the output to a motor control center (MCC) rated for 1250KVA, then bus bar connections to transformer.
                            You may find that you need 6 breakers in the MCC, and 6 panelboard when you do the math.

                            Dennis Schller P.E.
                            I would agree your way would be a possible solution but the single line presented had a 1000kva 11kv primary voltage [B]1 phase[/B] transformer which makes it very hard to come up with a serious answer or solution.

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                            • #29
                              My guess is the OP isn't working on a system to be built in the US.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by brewbeer View Post
                                My guess is the OP isn't working on a system to be built in the US.
                                For those of us in the U.S., let's hope not, or engineering protocol and who gets to practice engineering is really in the toilet. No discussion here, I hope, but whatever political stripe or views, we in the U.S. seem to have our hands full just now.

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