Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

4HP (3KW) DC water pump

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 4HP (3KW) DC water pump

    Hi folks:

    I just discovered this forum and this is my very first post!

    I am designing a solar water pumping system that will use a 4HP DC motor. However, I have not been able to find a pump after a quick search on the web. If nobody on the forum has knowledge of such motors, can you please point me in the right direction.

    is there such a thing as a 4HP submersible water well pump?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Shams View Post
    .....is there such a thing as a 4HP submersible water well pump?.
    Yes, but they are large, expensive, and nearly always AC, multi-phase
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post
      Yes, but they are large, expensive, and nearly always AC, multi-phase
      And any pumps that size that accept DC as input most likely contain an inverter drive which converts the DC to pulsed, multi-phase current to actually turn the motor.

      Take a look at the range of pumps (mostly smaller) made by Grundfos.
      SunnyBoy 3000 US, 18 BP Solar 175B panels.

      Comment


      • #4
        4hp? wow... I could run my lawn mower with that
        [CENTER]SunLight @ Night[/CENTER]

        Comment


        • #5
          That is really outside the scope and capability of solar. It can be done if money is no object, but it would take a large bank of batteries, VFD, and 3-phase motor. You are talking major expense.
          MSEE, PE

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sunking View Post
            That is really outside the scope and capability of solar. It can be done if money is no object, but it would take a large bank of batteries, VFD, and 3-phase motor. You are talking major expense.
            I have to respectfully disagree.

            The particular application that I am targeting is for commercial/industrial irrigation systems in the developing world which are either off-grid or have unreliable grid power. These systems do use large brushless DC motors and they are starting to be used by early adopters, although they have not gone mainstream yet. See link below.

            [HTML]http://www.lorentz.de/pdf/lorentz_casestudy_vineyardoregon_usa_en-us.pdf[/HTML]

            I understand that the upfront capital costs on these systems are high (compared to your average DIY system in the backyard). Nonetheless, in my opinion they are cost effective in the long term and do not require batteries, inverter, VFD and AC motors. You would need MPPT and a DC pump controller.

            Since, I started the thread, I have been able to find a 3.5 HP DC motor from Sunpumps.com

            Shams

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a 3HP brushless panel-direct SunPumps pump and it works pretty well. It is powered by 10 285 W panels, 5 in series x 2 parallel. It is capable of pushing water up hill about 70 feet at 25 gallons per minute and it maintains 70 PSI in the water line.

              So far I have three pumps from Sun Pumps and they've been really good about working with me to service them (a short developed in one of the controllers) and I have always been able to talk to a technician in a matter of minutes when I call.

              I would recommend calling them and talking to a sales engineer. Make sure you have flow rates, elevation and pressure requirements so that they can specify a pump for you. You may also want to have some idea of what panels you want to use so that you can come up with the optimal panel configuration for your needs.

              Note that this system only works when the sun is shining, which is fine for my case as the summers here are cloudless for months and I don't need to irrigate in the winter. If I had to run this on batteries it would be pretty difficult and expensive I imagine...

              Chris

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cjb80 View Post
                I have a 3HP brushless panel-direct SunPumps pump and it works pretty well. It is powered by 10 285 W panels, 5 in series x 2 parallel. It is capable of pushing water up hill about 70 feet at 25 gallons per minute and it maintains 70 PSI in the water line.

                So far I have three pumps from Sun Pumps and they've been really good about working with me to service them (a short developed in one of the controllers) and I have always been able to talk to a technician in a matter of minutes when I call.

                I would recommend calling them and talking to a sales engineer. Make sure you have flow rates, elevation and pressure requirements so that they can specify a pump for you. You may also want to have some idea of what panels you want to use so that you can come up with the optimal panel configuration for your needs.

                Note that this system only works when the sun is shining, which is fine for my case as the summers here are cloudless for months and I don't need to irrigate in the winter. If I had to run this on batteries it would be pretty difficult and expensive I imagine...

                Chris
                Thanks Chris!

                Comment

                Working...
                X