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Conext XW5548 low battery cut off (lbco) ?

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  • Conext XW5548 low battery cut off (lbco) ?

    Below is what my manual says about the LCBO option. I'm thinking of setting mine to the highest value (48v) to keep my batteries from deep discharge if the panels get covered with snow when the place is vacant. My concern is if the inverter shuts down after 24 hours does that mean it won't restart once the snow clears off the panels and the batteries charge back up? In other words is there only a 24 hour window for the voltage to come back up and the inverter to restart and after that it must be manually turned back on?

    Thanks for any help on this. I'd ask Schneider but they don't provide phone support any more and their email support sucks.


    "The Low Batt Cut Out setting is the lowest battery voltage level acceptable for use by the inverter. When the batteries discharge to the Low Batt Cut Out setting, and are held at or below this level for the LBCO Delay time, the inverter output shuts down and connects any available AC source (AC1 or AC2) to the charger to bring the battery level back above the Low Batt Cut Out setting. After shutdown, the inverter does not support loads on AC OUT, and AC loads must be powered by either a generator (AC2) or grid power (AC1). If the battery voltage stays below the LBCO voltage for more than 24 hours, the Conext XW+ shuts down"

  • #2
    I had a similar mentality and tried bumping up my cutoff. This resulted in some "low voltage" warning from my XW while running a fairly heavy load, even though the actual drop on the screen didn't appear that low. I opted for just shutting the inverter off when I'm not there to brush off the snow.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MichaelK! View Post
      I had a similar mentality and tried bumping up my cutoff. This resulted in some "low voltage" warning from my XW while running a fairly heavy load, even though the actual drop on the screen didn't appear that low. I opted for just shutting the inverter off when I'm not there to brush off the snow.
      Thanks but I have too much time and money tied up in cameras and a remote thermostat for my propane stove to give up. If you try the bumping it up again there is a time setting threshold so temporary large loads won't trigger a fault.

      Still trying to figure out what happens after 24 hours.

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      • #4
        Well my inverter when into standby when my batteries were at 52% according to my Trimetric meter. I guess they recovered a little bit of voltage and the power is back on. I suspect it will go into standby again shortly and after 24 hours will shutdown completely. Currently my meter is reading 51% SOC.

        We are under a winter storm warning until Friday evening. No sun forecast until Sunday and if the snow is drifted on my panels who knows how long it will take to melt. I'm 1,200 miles away and probably couldn't get up there to clear the panels even if I made the trip.

        Need to find somebody with a snowmobile willing to clear my panels. Batteries might already be damaged. Very frustrating.

        UPDATE: I don't think my inverter went into standby since I'm at 32% SOC and it's still on. I think the blizzard took the Hughesnet signal down for a couple hours.
        Last edited by hammick; 02-07-2020, 08:37 PM.

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