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Nissan Leaf battery for offgrid storage

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  • #16
    After a long pause, I come here to say that I bought a battery from a 2015 Nissan Leaf with only 10,000 km (ca. 6,200 miles). I find this offer in Norway (Europe) and it cost me 3100$ + 650$ transport.

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    • #17
      That is a good price. Please tell us how it works for you. I'd like to buy a Tesla PowerWall 14 kWh but it costs about $7K.

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      • #18
        Tesla PowerWall & others are plug&play type and are very easy to use, but are also expensive (for me) compare to battery from salvage.

        My battery arrived to me two days ago, and if are people interested in this story, I will tell you.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by vast View Post
          Tesla PowerWall & others are plug&play type and are very easy to use, but are also expensive (for me) compare to battery from salvage.

          My battery arrived to me two days ago, and if are people interested in this story, I will tell you.
          I wold like you to start a new Thread with the acquisition story .
          Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
          || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
          || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

          solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
          gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

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          • #20
            Mike,
            I live in Romania, EU country and I bought the battery from Norway, another EU country. Because you are familiar with US currency, so I writed all transaction in your money to be easy to understand. In this forum, most of the people are from US and I don't know if is someone interested how I bought, but I can tell on short.

            When I writed "this story", I mean how I will use and manage these battery to be useful to all others.
            Also, when I write in English my neurons are in full throttle, so I must to keep small phrases to be coherent, but thank you to encouraged me.
            Last edited by vast; 06-11-2018, 03:22 AM.

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            • #21
              Sure, I want to know about your story. I'm shopping for a Nissan Leaf battery 24 kWh. Nissan sells it for $5,500 but one needs to own the car and some other restrictions. I think I can get a used one for like the price that you found yours. Here in USA there are plenty of used Leaf cars, actually the entire car may be found used for like $7K.

              Please tell us how this battery works for you, how the battery behaves. Thanks.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by john95 View Post
                . Here in USA there are plenty of used Leaf cars, actually the entire car may be found used for like $7K.
                Stop and think about what you just said. It is true there are Thousands of used Leaf's, Volts, and other EV's setting on dealers lots dirt cheap collecting dust. 5 year old $25K to $40K dollar vehicles on sale at salvage prices. Would you sale your 5 year old BMW in good condition for $7000? No you would be a fool to do that.

                So why are so many so cheap for late model vehicles in good condition?

                Figure it out yet?

                Batteries are shot to hell. Nissan is up to its eyeballs in court with battery warranty claim lawsuits along with Chevy. That is why Nissan offers a $15K battery for $5 to Leaf owners to try to counter legal warranty claims.
                Last edited by Sunking; 06-11-2018, 03:50 PM.
                MSEE, PE

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                • #23
                  For those folks who are wondering if the batteries in these electric cars are any good, I STRONGLY suggest you get on youtube and visit some website forums where real users and real owners of these vehicles discuss their experiences.
                  Pretty much every electric vehicle brand has an independent forum of owners who discuss problems, experiences, etc.

                  There's one called mynissanleaf dot com. There is even threads with polls asking how many miles before folks lost the first of their 12 bars on their battery health meter on their dashboards. There are hundreds upon hundreds of threads discussing all kinds of characteristics and experiences with these vehicles.

                  Personally, I'm pretty impressed with the little reading I've done. Some of my questions have been answered, some not so much. But seriously, take the time to do your homework and listen to what the thousands of members of these different vehicle forums have to say.

                  And remember, using a battery in a car is going to be a lot more aggressive than using it for solar storage.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Murby View Post
                    For those folks who are wondering if the batteries in these electric cars are any good, I STRONGLY suggest you get on youtube and visit some website forums where real users and real owners of these vehicles discuss their experiences.
                    Pretty much every electric vehicle brand has an independent forum of owners who discuss problems, experiences, etc.

                    There's one called mynissanleaf dot com. There is even threads with polls asking how many miles before folks lost the first of their 12 bars on their battery health meter on their dashboards. There are hundreds upon hundreds of threads discussing all kinds of characteristics and experiences with these vehicles.

                    Personally, I'm pretty impressed with the little reading I've done. Some of my questions have been answered, some not so much. But seriously, take the time to do your homework and listen to what the thousands of members of these different vehicle forums have to say.

                    And remember, using a battery in a car is going to be a lot more aggressive than using it for solar storage.
                    While "used" EV batteries may be one way to have a solar energy storage system I just don't understand why there are so many "used" Leaf batteries available.

                    The car is not that old (first model available in the US in Dec 2010) I would think they would last longer then 8 years under normal use. Heck my Tundra is a 2003 with 205,000 miles and is still going strong.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

                      While "used" EV batteries may be one way to have a solar energy storage system I just don't understand why there are so many "used" Leaf batteries available.

                      The car is not that old (first model available in the US in Dec 2010) I would think they would last longer then 8 years under normal use. Heck my Tundra is a 2003 with 205,000 miles and is still going strong.
                      There aren't so many used leaf batteries available.. in fact, they're hard to find because people keep buying them up.. Seems that some folks are even willing to purchase an entire salvaged car just to get to the battery.

                      Hop around google yourself and go look for one.. Good luck! There just isn't that many of them available.

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                      • #26
                        I don't know how is in US, but in EU can find battery only from damaged cars.
                        Tips: if you want to buy, look for a car who is from cold region. Most of the problem with battery are form warm region, like Texas or Arizona.
                        HERE you can find a lot of tests made by your state department.

                        I bought my battery from Norway from these reasons:
                        - are more cheaper compare with other EU country because they have no TAX for EV
                        - it's a cold region

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                        • #27
                          I own a LEAF (not that it makes me an expert, but I have some experience and some data) - heat kills these batteries and Nissan did not provide any thermal management system like most other EVs. If sourcing a battery it is best to get it from a cooler climate - avoid cars that spent any time in hot climates. Battery temperature/time is the primary degradation factor in warm climates, not cycling. So if you own one of these, they need to be driven, A LOT, to have decent value in warm climates.

                          Anecdotally, 2015 24kWh packs seem to be the marginally better packs. Older packs degraded quickly, and the 30kWh packs are not doing so well. User posts are trending to show that 2016 LEAFs with 30kWh packs in warm clients probably have lower capacity today than a 24kWh LEAF bought at the same time and operated in the same environment.

                          Here is data from my LEAF a (2015 24kWhr in SoCal) showing AHr (on the left) and pack temperature (Fahrenheit on the right) over time since I have owned it (In another 3-4 years, this battery will be toast for me):

                          5.7 kW DC enphase M250 + SW285 solar patio cover

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by philips View Post
                            Here is data from my LEAF a (2015 24kWhr in SoCal) showing AHr (on the left) and pack temperature (Fahrenheit on the right) over time since I have owned it (In another 3-4 years, this battery will be toast for me):
                            You experience is normal for any EV. In 2 years you have lost 15% capacity. Regardless of battery chemistry the magic number is 80% capacity or 20% capacity loss. Magic happens when you hit 80%, capacity fade accelerates significantly. 3 to 4 years is a bit optimistic. Thus why there are thousands of used EV's for sell for pennies on a dollar.

                            Thanks for being honest. EV's are great if you lease one for 4 years so you do not get stuck with one when the battery needs replaced. No one will buy it.
                            Last edited by Sunking; 06-12-2018, 05:21 PM.
                            MSEE, PE

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Sunking View Post
                              You experience is normal for any EV.
                              Don't know too much about other EV models and their degradation, but I thought the LEAF was a bit worse on degradation than others (this may be because of the more limited range though, so owners are more vocal about it).
                              Originally posted by Sunking View Post
                              In 2 years you have lost 15% capacity.
                              This particular car is actually over 3 years old now - it was mfg 2/2015 and shows a 14% capacity loss at this point (62 AHr to 53.5 Ahr) - I leased a 2012 prior to this one and it had dropped 24% by the end of the 3 year lease - so this is a bit better than that one was.

                              Originally posted by Sunking View Post
                              Regardless of battery chemistry the magic number is 80% capacity or 20% capacity loss. Magic happens when you hit 80%, capacity fade accelerates significantly. 3 to 4 years is a bit optimistic. Thus why there are thousands of used EV's for sell for pennies on a dollar.

                              Thanks for being honest. EV's are great if you lease one for 4 years so you do not get stuck with one when the battery needs replaced. No one will buy it.

                              Thanks for the info - it will be interesting to see how this changes over time. Nissan's capacity warranty hits at 32.5% capacity loss - which I likely won't reach in the 60 month time frame.

                              Battery replacement used to be about $5000 from Nissan (includes $1500 core), but word is this has gone up significantly as Nissan sold off their battery plant and our now buying future batteries from LG, so I'll see where things are when that time comes.

                              The used market on these cars is strange - price seems to still be based on model year and mileage - the battery condition just isn't a factor - likely just ignorance.
                              5.7 kW DC enphase M250 + SW285 solar patio cover

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                              • #30
                                Please guys, can we focus on how to use these EV batteries on solar systems?

                                Thank you.


                                An article very interesting:
                                https://www.solarquotes.com.au/blog/...+Power+Blog%29
                                Last edited by vast; 06-13-2018, 05:33 PM.

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