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  • Load with inverter during peak hours


    Inverter is usually directly connected to the battery(bank). You can charge or discharge a battery. Both at the same time is according "to the books" not possible.

    No problem if you have (small) loads via dc output chargecontroller, the SC regulates.

    Question:
    What happend then if you load during peakhours via the inverter which is directly connected to the battery?



  • #2
    It may be a little hard to explain but a CC will both charge a battery system as well as pass on any extra amps to a load such as an inverter. The amps from the panels can flow through multiple paths but will take the less resistance path first. So your loads can be powered from both the solar panels and batteries depending on what they need at the time.

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    • #3
      CC I understand.

      But, when the inverter is connected directly to the battery , thus not in anyway connected to the CC, and there is a AC-load via the inverter during peak hours what happend then?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GeorgeF View Post
        CC I understand.

        But, when the inverter is connected directly to the battery , thus not in anyway connected to the CC, and there is a AC-load via the inverter during peak hours what happend then?
        Well if the CC is connected to the battery and the inverter is connected to the same battery terminals some of the charging amps from the panels will go to the batteries and some will go to the inverter. The AC load would not have a stable power supply unless the inverter is connected to the battery but can still get some power from the panels through the CC.

        In a hybrid grid tie system the home gets power from the panels unless there is some shade then it gets power from the battery system. If there is sun the home can get power from both the panels and battery system at the same time.

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        • #5
          In a hybrid grid tie system the grid can also provide load support depending on the mode programmed into the inverter and selected by the user.

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          • #6
            Hybrid is clear to me. Thanks for explaining me about the connection to the SAME battery terminals. I've learned again here ☺

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

              Well if the CC is connected to the battery and the inverter is connected to the same battery terminals some of the charging amps from the panels will go to the batteries and some will go to the inverter. The AC load would not have a stable power supply unless the inverter is connected to the battery but can still get some power from the panels through the CC.

              In a hybrid grid tie system the home gets power from the panels unless there is some shade then it gets power from the battery system. If there is sun the home can get power from both the panels and battery system at the same time.
              Already appreciated for your reply.

              Just curieus what will happen if I turn on this AC charger while the dc-led tube is still directly connected to the battery. The chargers amp is more than the load.

              While the lamp continously burns will the battery be charged?? Or, the lamp discharge the battery till empty and the battery can not be charged , no amps from the ac-charger coming in. .... ????
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GeorgeF View Post

                Already appreciated for your reply.

                Just curieus what will happen if I turn on this AC charger while the dc-led tube is still directly connected to the battery. The chargers amp is more than the load.

                While the lamp continously burns will the battery be charged?? Or, the lamp discharge the battery till empty and the battery can not be charged , no amps from the ac-charger coming in. .... ????
                If you have more charging amps going to the load and the battery then your load is using ,the battery should get charged. If the charging amps is coming from solar pv panels then you run the risk of discharging the battery with the LED tube should the sun not be there.

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                • #9
                  Thanks again for your reply.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GeorgeF View Post
                    Inverter is usually directly connected to the battery(bank). You can charge or discharge a battery. Both at the same time is according "to the books" not possible.

                    No problem if you have (small) loads via dc output chargecontroller, the SC regulates.

                    Question:
                    What happend then if you load during peakhours via the inverter which is directly connected to the battery?

                    "NET POWER"

                    The Charger, Battery, and Inverter are all one closed system. You are putting solar energy into the system and taking load energy out of the system, at the same time.

                    If you are putting more power into the system than you are taking out, you will have a Net Positive and the batteries will store the extra energy. (Charge)
                    If you are taking more power out of the system than you are putting in, you will have a Net Negative and the batteries will have to supply the make-up. (Discharge)
                    Eventually a Net Positive will become a Net Zero. The charge controller will see the battery is full, so it will taper back and just supply enough for the inverter.

                    Think about it like a shared bank account, where you're at work and your wife is at the mall.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ninety-9 SE-L View Post
                      "NET POWER"

                      The Charger, Battery, and Inverter are all one closed system. You are putting solar energy into the system and taking load energy out of the system, at the same time.
                      Thanks for your reply.
                      The system is in this (test)case only a battery and a charger or a ac-dc powersupply @ 14.4v.

                      The AC-DC source is directly continuously connected to the battery and in the evening, while still connected to the battery, the are some loads with total current less than the powersupply.

                      If I understood the above well, no need for a chargecontroller then with such a setup. If this is correct, and lets say the battery can supply 6 hours load @ max 50% DoD, i do not need to worry about low voltage disconnect.
                      Last edited by GeorgeF; 12-05-2019, 12:44 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GeorgeF View Post

                        Thanks for your reply.
                        The system is in this (test)case only a battery and a charger or a dc-ac powersupply @ 14.4v.

                        The AC-DC source is directly continuously connected to the battery and in the evening, while still connected to the battery, the are some loads with total current less than the powersupply.

                        If I understood the above well, no need for a chargecontroller then with such a setup. If this is correct, and lets say the battery can supply 6 hours load @ max 50% DoD, i do not need to worry about low voltage disconnect.
                        With a 50% DOD your battery will fail sooner then later. A low voltage disconnect would need to be programmable to be set at 12V or above. Most of the off the shelf type disconnect below 12V which is too low for a 12v battery.

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