Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Voltmeter connected to wifi or ethernet.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16

    I received some ESP8266 chips and started with the Arduino/ESP8266 integration for reading/transmitting voltage values over a TCP connection. The short story is I had trouble getting going. Not sure what my problem was (I'm an old software guy, not hardware competent.) So instead I used an ESP32 with integrated WiFi. The ESP32 works with the Arduino IDE and there are plenty of sketches available for getting wifi up and going. The bottom line is an ESP32 with voltage divider is a solution and if you have subscription to a web service or control of a web site, you can send the data to a server via URLs, MQTT, or other means. I used our website to receive a URL (via HTML GET), parse the data and put into a database (via mysql calls). There is lots of flexibility, and for me it's retaining the data that counts, not the display box on the wall that I hardly ever look at. Anyway, for what that's worth...

    The screen below shows the Arduino IDE on the left (running ESP32 sketch), the monitor in the middle spewing URLs and connection information, and the monitor on the right is the extracted data from the database in real time (just the last 10 entries since the data gats long). I didn't filter the data yet... it's divided down from 9 volts (not 48) and the ESP32 then translates 0..3.3V to 0..4096 so I haven't yet "normalized" the data to correct mV values. My plan is to run at 1 to 5 minute intervals to start, adjust as necessary. I plan to write server monitoring software or use other open source SW to have another eye on the battery performance. The server can be anywhere, as can the visual analysis... not fixed to a wall

    2020-01-21 (6).png

    Comment

    Working...
    X