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Is anyone making an 'analog' (no PCB) tankless water heater these days?

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  • Is anyone making an 'analog' (no PCB) tankless water heater these days?

    After about 25 years of uninterupted service, our Paloma PH-24M-DP tankless water heater has suffered an incurable leak on one of the heat exchanger pipes. I've noticed pretty much every modern tankless heater is equipped with sensors, computer controls, digital screens, etc.

    Are there any 'analog non-PCB' tankless water heaters available these days??

  • #2
    Try a heat pump water heater.
    9 kW solar. Driving EVs since 2012

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    • #3
      There are small ones for camping and RV's , but nothing household size
      Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
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      • #4
        Wasn't Paloma bought out by Rheem.
        I see that Rheem has some models available that are not overly electronic heavy but they still have electronics.
        I suspect that industry standards now require this extra level of safety.
        http://www.costoftanklesswaterheater...RTG-84XLN.html

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        • #5
          Our failed unit has 3 wires inside it. New units have miles of wiring. On top of that, they require an AC outlet to function but many manufacturers do not list the electrical specs (watts required) for their gas heaters.

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          • #6
            I've got this one right now.
            https://www.sportsmansguide.com/prod...ater?a=1588405
            I connected it years ago to a 5 gallon tank, then finally plumbed it to the cabin propane gas. It only uses D-cells for sparking

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            • #7
              We ended up getting our Paloma PH24 fixed. After two plumbers butchered it, I took it to an automotive radiator repair shop where they immediately laughed at the jobs done by the plumbers. They patched up the core and it has been running flawlessly for months now.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ron_jeremy View Post
                We ended up getting our Paloma PH24 fixed. After two plumbers butchered it, I took it to an automotive radiator repair shop where they immediately laughed at the jobs done by the plumbers. They patched up the core and it has been running flawlessly for months now.
                I'm guessing here, but although it probably matters little to you, for the sake of others reading this thread, the repair done as you describe would probably not be allowed under any common building code in the U.S.

                Repairing a pressure vessel is a task not to be taken lightly.

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                • #9
                  Is a tankless water heater really a pressure vessel in that regard?

                  I know you will be tempted to type out a 1000 word rebuttal but not needed. I'm simply pointing out the relatively low risk of that repair, especially compared to other items we accept willingly into our homes. For instance, a countertop Soda Stream bottle pressurizing in the kitchen multiple times a day while 18" from the face is far more likely to burst and injure someone than a tankless water heater in the garage or closet if it bursts a seam.
                  Dave W. Gilbert AZ
                  6.63kW grid-tie owner

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by azdave View Post
                    Is a tankless water heater really a pressure vessel in that regard?

                    I know you will be tempted to type out a 1000 word rebuttal but not needed. I'm simply pointing out the relatively low risk of that repair, especially compared to other items we accept willingly into our homes. For instance, a countertop Soda Stream bottle pressurizing in the kitchen multiple times a day while 18" from the face is far more likely to burst and injure someone than a tankless water heater in the garage or closet if it bursts a seam.
                    Yes it is.

                    Technically it's a fired pressure vessel and so will be required to meet A.S.M.E pressure vessel code requirements for construction and repair as required by every U.S. State. and most of the rest of developed world.

                    But rather than bore you with a lot of necessary knowledge I've learned after a career of boiler and pressure vessel design, including couple of stints on Pressure Vessel subcommittees (including how to look for exceptions that might exempt an application), I'll ask you why you think an instantaneous water heater with a pressure boundary and designed to operate under pressure and heat input is not subject to the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code - including repair and inspection requirements.
                    Last edited by J.P.M.; 10-28-2021, 04:38 PM.

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