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Time of Use and/or Demand Rate Plans in the Absence of Solar

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  • Time of Use and/or Demand Rate Plans in the Absence of Solar

    We are moving from hotter-than-Hades Phoenix to a milder/cooler climate in Sedona, AZ. Going from a home with gas heat/hot water and solar to all-electric with heat pumps and no solar will be quite a change. The only available rate plans are a T.O.U. plan (3pm to 8pm weekday peak hours), a "moderate" demand plan and a far more aggressive demand plan. Prior to installing solar seven years ago, we had been able to make a demand plan work fairly well but it had different peak hours. I'm thinking it might be best to go with the moderate demand plan initially and see how things go for the next year. I know APS has a comparative tool once you've been on a plan for an extended period of time. If anyone has suggestions especially based on experience, I'm all ears!

  • #2
    Ugh! All electric and heat pumps. Sorry to hear that.

    I don't like any demand plans. I would choose a basic TOU to get started and pre-cool to avoid the peak times. Re-evaluate after you get to know the new place and climate .

    My daughter lived at the Verde Valley School in Oak Creek Village for many years with beautiful views of Sedona (but not close enough to have to deal with the tourists). We could walk down to the Red Rock crossing from the other side of the state park to enjoy Oak Creek on hot days. No need to fight the crowds at Slide Rock.

    sedona-red-rock-crossing-photo.jpg


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    Dave W. Gilbert AZ
    6.63kW grid-tie owner

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    • #3
      Originally posted by azdave View Post
      Ugh! All electric and heat pumps. Sorry to hear that.

      I don't like any demand plans. I would choose a basic TOU to get started and pre-cool to avoid the peak times. Re-evaluate after you get to know the new place and climate .

      My daughter lived at the Verde Valley School in Oak Creek Village for many years with beautiful views of Sedona (but not close enough to have to deal with the tourists). We could walk down to the Red Rock crossing from the other side of the state park to enjoy Oak Creek on hot days. No need to fight the crowds at Slide Rock.

      sedona-red-rock-crossing-photo.jpg

      We're actually in the Village of Oak Creek too within walking distance of the trails around Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte. I think we could also do that walk you're talking about. Lots of options. Originally we were looking mostly in Sedona proper but found what we think is an ideal home for us in VOC. Increasingly, I'm hearing residents of Sedona complaining about how so many homes are being bought up and turned into airb&b's by absentee owners.Neighborhoods are being debased by transient strangers who have little or no pride in where they are staying. Fortunately, the entire VOC is one big HOA where AirB&Bs are not permitted.

      Funny, gas in the VOC is hit and miss: a nearby street has gas but ours doesn't. I guess you can petition to get gas but I think you have to get all the neighbors to agree on doing so before the gas utility will consider it. Haven't ruled out solar either.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ian S View Post
        We are moving from hotter-than-Hades Phoenix to a milder/cooler climate in Sedona,
        AZ. Going from a home with gas heat/hot water and solar to all-electric with heat pumps and no solar will be
        quite a change.

        If anyone has suggestions especially based on experience, I'm all ears!
        I would check out your heat pumps. If they are old and noisy, they may have a SEER
        of around 14 and a COP around 2. The latest (which I am using exclusively) have
        a SEER of 33 and a COP around 4, besides being SOOO quiet and with a few other
        advantages. good luck, Bruce Roe

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bcroe View Post

          I would check out your heat pumps. If they are old and noisy, they may have a SEER
          of around 14 and a COP around 2. The latest (which I am using exclusively) have
          a SEER of 33 and a COP around 4, besides being SOOO quiet and with a few other
          advantages. good luck, Bruce Roe
          Thanks Bruce those are good points. The home was built in 1991. Looks like they are Goodman or predecessor products. A Google search suggests that the first two digits of the S/N (90...) are the year of manufacture which, if true, means they are original. Yikes!

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