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  • #16
    Originally posted by SunEagle View Post

    Depending on the battery chemistry a DIY solar/battery system can cost about $1500 per each kWh it can safely delivery each day. So with a $3000 budget you are probably looking at a system that can deliver about 2 - 2.5 kWh a day if you find your equipment at low prices.

    Unfortunately solar is not cheap to use as an emergency backup system for short duration power outages. For that matter solar may not really work for long outages if you do not get a good amount of sunlight.
    What I've found (and I suspect everyone but me already knew) is the batteries are expensive. I found brand new panels (250w) for $100 each on Craigslist. Likewise the MPPT controller and combiner box were reasonable. Batteries have to be brand new and I looked for months. I ultimately bought 2 12v 200ah AGM group 4Ds for $508 total - delivered to my door. Probably should of (and may still yet) buy two more.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by rickdarling View Post

      What I've found (and I suspect everyone but me already knew) is the batteries are expensive. I found brand new panels (250w) for $100 each on Craigslist. Likewise the MPPT controller and combiner box were reasonable. Batteries have to be brand new and I looked for months. I ultimately bought 2 12v 200ah AGM group 4Ds for $508 total - delivered to my door. Probably should of (and may still yet) buy two more.
      The $100 for a 250w panel is a good price. Unless you really need AGM type batteries you can get the same amount of Ah out of FLA type for about half of that $508 that you paid. Still it sounds like you are building a low cost system. Just remember that what you pay for in a quality MPPT type CC will be worth the cost. Don't skimp on the systems "brains".

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      • #18
        For whatever reason, I could not find FLA batteries of 200 AH + for much less. I thought I did pretty well at $252 each including tax and delivery. This is what I typically saw for FLA:

        https://www.altestore.com/store/deep...E#CRWCR-215FLA

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        • #19
          Originally posted by rickdarling View Post
          For whatever reason, I could not find FLA batteries of 200 AH + for much less. I thought I did pretty well at $252 each including tax and delivery. This is what I typically saw for FLA:

          https://www.altestore.com/store/deep...E#CRWCR-215FLA
          Actually the price of $252 for a 12V 200Ah AGM battery is pretty good except for their weight.

          Why don't you look into 6V batteries instead of 12V. They come in all types of Ah ratings and have pretty high cycle count so should last longer then AGM type.

          You might find they are easier to wire 2 x 6V in series then 2 x 12V in parallel.

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          • #20
            I'm running the two 12v batteries in series for 200AH at 24v. The thought was it would be easier to deal with two 12v batteries instead of four 6v however, it looks like I may end up buying two additional batteries and will end up with 400AH at 24v. Unfortunately they do weight 127 lbs. each.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Yet another Yeti View Post
              Posting from Europe :
              Does not give you an excuse to ramble off into grid phasing situations:
              1) don't apply at all to Los Angeles
              2) are incorrect in other areas
              3) just plain wrong.

              Please stay within your field of expertize and don't "wonder about" factors or situations that are miles away from the topic. The OP is pondering an
              emergency backup situation for simple basics, not a whole house solution. Throwing in random, meaningless commnets about large batteries and large PV arrays, is out of the scope of this topic.

              12 V * 200 Ah * 2 parallel = 4'800 WattHours ...

              When the average consumption in the USA is some 20 to 40 kWh a day ,
              then 4.8 kWh are some 5th or 10th of daily "needs" .

              Especially in Emergency Situations like Andrea's Fault Earth Quakes ,
              heavy gear will be requested , especially from neighbouring countries peoples
              and "juristications" .

              Both ways , either for self consumption or export into grids ,
              the batteries make no sense in that tiny size .


              For hazard conditions , I personally would re-commend at least 5 kiloWatt in
              Solar Panel size , better 10 kW , because production is averaged
              2/3s of installed size , of course in times of sun radiation ....

              And then it would need "at least" a 5 kWh battery to provide one to three hours
              of electriciity to a wired chain saw .

              I honestly would advise to put up as much Watts of panels as "recommended"
              by the local circumstances during "normal" conditions .

              In an off-grid situation , a battery bank would need to deliver each PHASE
              , which likely are TWO in a Split-Phase environment , and three in a
              common non-North-American environment .

              Overall the size of around 1 kW DC is able to support basic consumption
              one ONE phase only .

              The size could be deployed at colony gardens and Recreational Vehicles ,
              but for a "normal" household it would just deliver additional
              current , to lesser grid consumption .

              But people might need to go step-by-step , especially when it needs to
              (missing word here) family members of some gender , that where
              considered "non-humans" during the Middle Ages .

              For just 4 Panels , non-roof , I would deploy Micro-Inverters ,
              as for example produced by Enphase, ABB, Siemens ;
              without battery and just lower grid usage .

              But if there would be near-time futural positive outlooks ,
              then one could even think of an over-powered string inverter .

              Hope, that Helps .


              No, thats not at all helpful to the OP's topic

              Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
              || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
              || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

              solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
              gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

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              • #22
                After ordering the Go Power 24v 1000w Inverter, I'm now concentrating on the connections. Going to stay with 2 batteries to start and will place them in an end to end battery box with ventilation. For ease of wiring, I'm talking to the folks at connect ease. They make series plugs for 24v trolling motor set ups and I like the idea of using them. Any thoughts? Here is a rough drawing I sent them this Morning representing what I had in mind. They will fab up what ever is needed.

                I would appreciate any constructive criticism.

                19-04-16 Draft Connect Ease Drawing.pdf

                This is a Connect Ease set up for trolling motors:

                19-04-16 Connect Ease Sample.jpg



                My batteries on trickle charge

                : 19-04-16 12v 200 AH Battery Pic.jpg



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                • #23
                  From what I can tell from that cable is you run the trolling motor on 24 volts and charge with 12 volt charger. Is that how you plan on charging them? Those are Anderson connectors which make disconnecting the batteries in a boat easier. In a stationary application you will get less resistance if you wire the batteries direct. Probably cheaper too.

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                  • #24
                    Thanks Ampster. I hadn't considered resistance from the connectors.

                    No sure if I have my diagram wrong or not in term of charging at 24v. I'm expecting comments from connect ease and will wait to hear what they say.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by rickdarling View Post
                      .......

                      No sure if I have my diagram wrong or not in term of charging at 24v. I'm expecting comments from connect ease and will wait to hear what they say.
                      I didnt look at your diagram earlier. Your wires to the controller are shorted. As far as I know you can connect controller and inverter to same 24v connection. No need for Anderson plugs unless you want to move someting or have emergency disconnect.

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