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  • Need advice on different options.

    1) 23 Solarworld SW 345 XL Mono Clear
    7.935 KW
    23 Enphase M250 Micro Inverters
    $22,200 $ 2.79 per watt

    2) 23 Solarworld SW 345 XL Mono Clear
    7.935 KW Photovoltaic System
    1 Solar edge System
    $21,384 $ 2.69 per watt

    3) 24 Canadian Solar CSGX 340
    8.16 KW
    1 Solar edge System
    $22,440 $ 2.75 per watt

    4) 22 LG 370
    8.14KW
    1 Solar edge System
    $26,455 $3.25 per watt

    5)Panasonic VBHN330SA
    7.92 KW
    1 Solar edge System
    $26,532 $ 3.35


  • #2
    I would think option 3 looks the goods or 2 that looks a good deal as well, cheers

    Comment


    • #3
      I have been doing quite a bit of reading but I cant decide on the micro inverters or solar edge.

      Comment


      • #4
        How much electricity do you use in a year ?

        How much does it cost you per year for electricity ?

        Any consideration of conservation measures before the PV ?

        What's your zip code ?

        What will be the array orientation ?

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        • #5
          I have averaged 11,000 KWH per year and I have estimated the usage for a pool pump that I am currently in the process of building. I spend about $250 per month on average and live in 93601. My array will be on the south side of my house with 10% shading.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Nycali98 View Post
            I have averaged 11,000 KWH per year and I have estimated the usage for a pool pump that I am currently in the process of building. I spend about $250 per month on average and live in 93601. My array will be on the south side of my house with 10% shading.
            Thank you. FWIW, I'd pass on the micros, but I'd pass on solar edge as well and keep as much of the electronic hardware off the roof and in a semi climate controlled environment. The thrill of individual monitoring tends to wear off quickly. One panel failure may go unnoticed. A string inverter failure will get a lot more notice a lot quicker.
            Last edited by J.P.M.; 03-20-2017, 12:52 AM.

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            • #7
              I not a fan of any of them unless you have shading issues, then 2 through 5 are in the running but would need more info.

              I will state out front I am not a fan of putting in inverters that are significantly smaller than the rated capacity of an inverter. Maybe its not an issue in CA but in my location in the north, my panels can and do exceed the rated wattage during cold clear conditions. Even though Enphase puts out position papers on why it makes sense to put a much high rated wattage panel into 250 watt microinverter, that doesn't mean its the right thing to do except for Enphase's bottom line (which sure looks like its in its death throes).

              Options 2 to 4 don't indicate what actual optimizer they are using with the panels. Solar edge offers 5 models ranging rom 300 to 405 watts. https://www.solaredge.com/us/products/power-optimizer#/ I would like to know which on they are going with, the undersized P300 (which is still a big step up compared to a 250 watts Enphase) or the next model up, the P320 which is lot closer to option 2 3 and 5. For option 4 I would suggest that the P370 should be installed as the gap between the 320 and 370 watt panel is kind of steep. .

              They also do not indicate the solaredge inverter model but I would guess its the 7600 A which is rated max output of 8360 Watts which should be fine with your planned panels. If they suggest a 6000A I would suggest finding another firm. Like the Enphase, sure the manufacturer says you can connect up to 8100 watts but its max output is 6000 watts so you are running out of inverter quite often plus I don't believe in running electronics at 100% 24/7.

              Unless you have shading issues you would end up with far more standard system if you went with a regular string inverter (or possibly two). In that size range I believe you can get 4000 watt units with two MPPT inputs which means a total of 4 independent strings which can minimize the impact of shading if the layout is done correctly. This is far less vulnerable to a manufacturer going out of business that supplied a proprietary component. I also like that a string inverter can be installed in far nicer environment than bolted to the back of panel (like microinveter or Solar edge). If you go SMA you can even get two 15 amp SPS outlets that run even when the grid is down.

              Micros and Solar edges are real popular with installers as they are plug and play. Buy a few cases of standard parts and its hard to screw up an install. String inverters require bit more planning and up front calculators and if configured wrong out in the field may not perform well. The trade off if long term performance and reliability should be better with string inverters plus the initial cost can be less for installers that are willing to do their homework.

              Comment


              • #8
                Peakbagger,

                Yes in there bids the solar edge inverter model is the 7600. I was thinking of adding additional panels in the future for a electric car. I would possibly need a additional 8-10 panels for that. I was going to have them install a SolarEdge SE10000A-US 10kW Inverter with Revenue Grade Meter and Rapid Shutdown so that I wouldn't need to upgrade down the road. I believe there were going to use the Solar edge 400W optimizer. As far as shading issues I have about 10% shading issue which I am sure will gradually occur as the trees come mature. Thanks in advance for your advice

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                • #9
                  Neither the P300 or P320 is compatible electrically with those panels, the P400 is appropriate (the P370 is brand new, but also ok). The voltage is used along with the power rating to choose the correct optimizer.

                  If you have 200 A service with a 200 A bus, increasing beyond the 7600A will add cost for service panel changes / upgrades that you might otherwise avoid. Instead of increasing the system size, consider using the time to look for ways to reduce your consumption, so that by the time you add the car, your current array has the capacity to cover that additional energy.

                  It is hard to justify the statement that long term performance would be better with a string inverter. The risks of a proprietary system and additional points of failure are real, but everything on paper says that even in a shade free environment, a functioning SolarEdge system will equal or slightly outperform a string inverter over time, and I've seen no data that suggests otherwise. Whether or not that is worth the risks is a judgement call. Reliability is hard to pin down, too... everything will fail eventually, but there isn't great data out there to indicate differences in time to failure between systems.

                  SMA systems are creeping toward proprietary, as well... if rapid shutdown is required, only their own branded solution will allow the SPS to function.
                  CS6P-260P/SE3000 - http://tiny.cc/ed5ozx

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sensij View Post
                    Neither the P300 or P320 is compatible electrically with those panels, the P400 is appropriate (the P370 is brand new, but also ok). The voltage is used along with the power rating to choose the correct optimizer.

                    If you have 200 A service with a 200 A bus, increasing beyond the 7600A will add cost for service panel changes / upgrades that you might otherwise avoid. Instead of increasing the system size, consider using the time to look for ways to reduce your consumption, so that by the time you add the car, your current array has the capacity to cover that additional energy.

                    It is hard to justify the statement that long term performance would be better with a string inverter. The risks of a proprietary system and additional points of failure are real, but everything on paper says that even in a shade free environment, a functioning SolarEdge system will equal or slightly outperform a string inverter over time, and I've seen no data that suggests otherwise. Whether or not that is worth the risks is a judgement call. Reliability is hard to pin down, too... everything will fail eventually, but there isn't great data out there to indicate differences in time to failure between systems.

                    SMA systems are creeping toward proprietary, as well... if rapid shutdown is required, only their own branded solution will allow the SPS to function.
                    FWIW, +1 on the use reduction. Simply the most cost effective way to lower an electric bill.

                    On reliability: Fewer equipment = lower probability of failure --->>>> fewest components = string inverter. No promises. Just maybe better chances. String inverters: Easier access, fewer components, probably of location in a less severe environment. Pay your money, take your choice and your chances.

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