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  • #31
    Ha. When I worked at the copper mine (30ish years ago), I can tell you that the conduit was frequently installed from the ends towards the middle, even if a full pull was pretty feasible. That was an IBEW union shop too.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by foo1bar View Post

      You won't be compliant with NEC 300.18A

      Whether you can get away with it is a completely different question.
      my point was different- there's no way anyone can tell the difference and my overall understanding is NEC mostly concerned with the finished result, not the process which produced it. Otherwise inspectors would need to be present at all times to oversee the construction. That might be sometimes the case but not on residential jobs.

      BTW, 2014 NEC reads: "Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be installed complete between outlet, ..." which makes sense- why on Earth someone would install raceway with covers in parts while it can be fully assembled and then wires pulled through using those covers? In OP case his PVC raceway does not have those covers so for me the jury is out why it is not code complaint.
      Last edited by max2k; 09-13-2017, 10:43 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mike90250 View Post
        I pulled 980' of #6 x3 aluminum when I did my runs. About 6 quarts of elephant snot (cable lube) and 4 pull stations, each manned, and did it in one pass. Used the tractor to hold a bank of pulleys up high, to feed the spools down into the conduit. I used the nylon webbing pull tape
        why not 1000' ? Now you have to live with that For me it's pretty impressive.
        Last edited by max2k; 09-13-2017, 10:44 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by max2k View Post

          well, if its threaded raceway I'd understand the point to avoid twisting wires in already pulled section otherwise
          PVC elbow can be pulled over wire and glued in place without jeopardizing quality. You won't be able to tell how
          it was done after the fact.
          The end elbows were glued on. Bruce Roe

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          • #35
            Originally posted by max2k View Post

            my point was different- there's no way anyone can tell the difference and my overall understanding is NEC mostly concerned with the finished result, not the process which produced it. Otherwise inspectors would need to be present at all times to oversee the construction. That might be sometimes the case but not on residential jobs.

            BTW, 2014 NEC reads: "Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be installed complete between outlet, ..." which makes sense- why on Earth someone would install raceway with covers in parts while it can be fully assembled and then wires pulled through using those covers? In OP case his PVC raceway does not have those covers so for me the jury is out why it is not code complaint.
            It reads:
            "Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be installed complete ... prior to the installation of conductors."

            A PVC raceway doesn't have those covers - therefore it doesn't fall into the exception for ones having covers.
            Since it doesn't fall into that exception it would be subject to the rule.
            And the rule is that it must be installed completely BEFORE pulling wires.

            busways with covers they make an exception for - so those can have the wires installed while they are still being put together.
            For example, a set of busways at the top of rows of computer racks. With this exception the electrician can do just a few racks, and put in the wire, then extend the busway to the next set of racks, install the wire, and so on. Without the exception they'd have to install the *complete* set before running any wires.

            my point was different- there's no way anyone can tell the difference
            If you are careful about it, you can probably make it so noone can tell the difference.
            But you still were not doing the install to code.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by foo1bar View Post

              It reads:
              "Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be installed complete ... prior to the installation of conductors."

              A PVC raceway doesn't have those covers - therefore it doesn't fall into the exception for ones having covers.
              Since it doesn't fall into that exception it would be subject to the rule.
              And the rule is that it must be installed completely BEFORE pulling wires.

              busways with covers they make an exception for - so those can have the wires installed while they are still being put together.
              For example, a set of busways at the top of rows of computer racks. With this exception the electrician can do just a few racks, and put in the wire, then extend the busway to the next set of racks, install the wire, and so on. Without the exception they'd have to install the *complete* set before running any wires.



              If you are careful about it, you can probably make it so noone can tell the difference.
              But you still were not doing the install to code.
              OK, I stand corrected and admit that reading/understanding NEC is not my strong point, thanks for clarification. Weird requirement though, I'd expect it to be the exact opposite in PVC case. I also completely assembled my exposed EMT raceway which has covers on pulling elbows and then pulled the wires as it was easier this way.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by max2k View Post

                why not 1000' ? Now you have to live with that For me it's pretty impressive.
                I got lucky that it didn't end up being 1020 feet. That would have been bad. I used a measuring wheel down a wooded hillside, bought and laid conduit and counted the 20' pieces used, then ordered reels of cable.
                cables3.jpg
                Powerfab top of pole PV mount (2) | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
                || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
                || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

                solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
                gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister

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                • #38
                  Last evening I installed the conduit inside my garage and finished pulling the wire between a disconnect switch and the subpanel where I am tying in. I made all connections and tested to ensure that the multigates power up. I now just need to make the connections to tie my micros into the multigate and finish up some grounding. Perhaps I'll have panels going up this weekend .

                  As I'll have all of my AC cabling and ground connected first, is there any reason that I can't power the system up and begin connecting panels as I get them installed?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by brant2000 View Post
                    As I'll have all of my AC cabling and ground connected first, is there any reason that I can't power the system up and begin connecting panels as I get them installed?
                    Have you passed inspection and been given the OK to generate by your power company?
                    CS6P-260P/SE3000 - http://tiny.cc/ed5ozx

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by sensij View Post

                      Have you passed inspection and been given the OK to generate by your power company?
                      Not to generate, but am allowed up to 2 hours for "testing purposes".

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                      • #41
                        I got my panels installed over the weekend. It is now definitely apparent that shading is probably a little worse than I had expected and I need to do some tree trimming. That said, I think it turned out really great and can't wait to get the final approvals to go live full time. I don't have my network connection installed yet, so no way to meter production. I was able to verify that my meter was spinning in reverse, so at least know that the system was live.

                        IMG_20170917_153242388.jpg

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                        • #42
                          Looks a nice profession job. I am bit confused with the extra rake boards on each side of the array, aesthetics or practical? I would suggest trimming back the trees at the back of the array to cut down on squirrel traffic. It appears as though the bottom of the panels are less than 8 feet from the ground, some AHJs require that the array under the array be enclosed with locked fence. Alternatively you may need to enclose the wiring underneath the panels with hardware cloth or similar mechanically attached barrier. I like the hardware cloth option as it also may be good rodent and bird proofing.

                          If you just cant wait for a network connection, flip al the breakers in the house off except for the PV and use the house meter to calculate the production. Good excuse to exercise all the breakers, of course the inevitable darn flashing clocks will drive you nuts until you reset them.

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                          • #43
                            Thanks!
                            Originally posted by peakbagger View Post
                            I am bit confused with the extra rake boards on each side of the array, aesthetics or practical?
                            Yeah, they sort of ended up being somewhat vestigial. I had started with a consistent 24" spacing, but then doubled up on both sides of the posts, for additional support. I may just remove the boards at the end.

                            I have a little cheap-o meter that I installed on my car charging outlet a few years ago. I may swap that over to this circuit, just for an easy way to view/tally power/energy production; but I'll wait until after I've gotten all my inspections. The inspector is supposed to be coming today.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by brant2000 View Post
                              Thanks!

                              Yeah, they sort of ended up being somewhat vestigial. I had started with a consistent 24" spacing, but then doubled up on both sides of the posts, for additional support. I may just remove the boards at the end.
                              Usually ground mounts are done with the modules in landscape and the rails north/south. Is there a reason you did yours portrait instead of the landscape? it would seem that you could have skipped all the 2X6s.
                              OutBack FP1 w/ CS6P-250P http://bit.ly/1Sg5VNH

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by ButchDeal View Post

                                Is there a reason you did yours portrait instead of the landscape?
                                It was the way that seemed to make the most sense to me, as I have experience constructing other things (decks and a treehouse) in this fashion with typical beams and joists. I had considered going that route, but generally figured that lumber was cheaper and easier to use than metal rails and decided that this approach had a higher lumber:rail proportion.

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