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  • #16
    Originally posted by dlnelsonroca View Post
    I was told when I bought the system that the eight panels and four batteries should deliver an average of 6 kwh daily. Is that incorrect?
    No I do not think so. For 6 Kwh of usable power your battery needs a capacity of 30 Kwh. Your batteries have a capacity of 14.4 Kwh. There is no way your 1000 watt panel array can generate 6 Kwh/day

    Originally posted by dlnelsonroca View Post
    My hydrometer is one I bought at Autozone, is about a foot long glass tube with a weighted float in it, and has a green area (1.275 - 1.3), and two other colors indicating lesser readings.

    The readings this morning before dawn were:
    1 - 1.3
    2 - 1.3
    3 - 1.3
    4 - 1.275
    5 - 1.3
    6 - 1.3
    7 - 1.3
    8 - 1.275
    9 - 1.275
    10 - 1.3
    11 - 1.275
    12 - 1.275

    A few weeks ago I removed some liquid and then added electrolyte to all the cells because they were reading below 1.225, I assume from being practically discharged several times, after which they were only charging during the day to 80%, and at night 10%. Since I added electrolyte the levels have been pretty much the same as above, charging each day to 100% with the morning charge levels written above.
    You should not have done that. You also need to get rid of that Autozone hydrometer and get a good hydrometer. You SPG indicate cells 4, 8, 9, 11, and 12 indicate 100% charged. The others are severely overcharged which is likely caused from you removing and replacing electrolyte.
    MSEE, PE

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    • #17
      Wow, thanks. So I'll remove some electrolyte and add the special water I have for batteries until I get the hydrometer readings where they should be. I won't be able to get a better hydrometer for some months because of my location, but I'll get one.

      So how many similar panels and batteries will I need to generate an average of 5 and 6 kwh daily at my latitude of 1556'49.85"N and 9720'59.18"W just a few hundred yards from the Pacific Ocean, and with an almost perfect east/west orientation? I ask for both 5 and 6 kwh a day because my budget is tight, and so I'll have to weigh the options.

      Thanks you again in advance!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by dlnelsonroca View Post
        W

        So how many similar panels and batteries will I need to generate an average of 5 and 6 kwh daily at my latitude of 1556'49.85"N and 9720'59.18"W just a few hundred yards from the Pacific Ocean, and with an almost perfect east/west orientation? I ask for both 5 and 6 kwh a day because my budget is tight, and so I'll have to weigh the options.

        Thanks you again in advance!
        A lot depends on what season of the year you need to be assured of that much power (even at your low lattitude) . If you will need 5Kwh per day in midwinter, and allowing for cloudy days, you will need more panels. If you want to get 5Kwh per day averaged over the whole year or just during the summer, you may only need half as many.

        The east-west orientation is also going to hurt you if the mounting surface is sloped. Less of an effect it the panels can be mounted flat.

        So, a little more information please.
        SunnyBoy 3000 US, 18 BP Solar 175B panels.

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        • #19
          I need to know for the entire year since I live here year round. Where I have my house is flat, the nearest mountain being a few miles away. I have the panels mounted on a flat roof with a 15 degree inclination facing due south. Should I mount them flat then?

          We have sun all year long, but a definite rainy season during July through September. It usually rains hard every afternoon for an hour or two, and then the sun comes out again. There are usually a few times when it will rain less hard for two or three days without stopping. The lowest temperature on this coast is 70 degrees at night, rising into the 80s or 90s every day, winter or not.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by dlnelsonroca View Post
            I need to know for the entire year since I live here year round. Where I have my house is flat, the nearest mountain being a few miles away. I have the panels mounted on a flat roof with a 15 degree inclination facing due south. Should I mount them flat then?
            No. I was just concerned that your mention of East-West orientation meant that you were going to mount the panels on an already more steeply pitched roof facing east or west.
            That part of your setup will be just fine.
            SunnyBoy 3000 US, 18 BP Solar 175B panels.

            Comment


            • #21
              So, what do you all think about the another part of my previous post:

              "So how many similar panels and batteries will I need to generate an average of 5 and 6 kwh daily at my latitude of 1556'49.85"N and 9720'59.18"W just a few hundred yards from the Pacific Ocean, and with an almost perfect east/west orientation? I ask for both 5 and 6 kwh a day because my budget is tight, and so I'll have to weigh the options."

              "A lot depends on what season of the year you need to be assured of that much power (even at your low lattitude) . If you will need 5Kwh per day in midwinter, and allowing for cloudy days, you will need more panels. If you want to get 5Kwh per day averaged over the whole year or just during the summer, you may only need half as many."

              "I need to know for the entire year since I live here year round. Where I have my house is flat, the nearest mountain being a few miles away. I have the panels mounted on a flat roof with a 15 degree inclination facing due south."

              "We have sun all year long, but a definite rainy season during July through September. It usually rains hard every afternoon for an hour or two, and then the sun comes out again. There are usually a few times when it will rain less hard for two or three days without stopping. The lowest temperature on this coast is 70 degrees at night, rising into the 80s or 90s every day, winter or not."


              Thanks again!

              Comment

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