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Thread: How do you solder 6X6, three tabbed cells @ the end ?

  1. #31
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    Step 1 lay both cells face up next to each other leaving a bit of space between (about 1/4").
    step 2 Connect the three bus on the back of one to the three bus on the front of the other.
    Step 3 On the cell that you connected the back of, to the other cell to the front, solder the three bus together at the end opposite where you soldered the other tabs. This will be one end of the circuit.
    step 4 turn the whole assembly over.
    step 5 on the cell that is connected to the other side connect the three bus together at the other end from where the cells are connected together. This will be the other end of the circuit.
    Rich
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by _madtrapper View Post
    I'm trying to figure out WHY I cannot get more than .5v out of 2 cells rated @ 4.1v. I'm trying to be as explicable as possible.
    Because someone gave you wrong information. each cell can ONLY create .5V , unless you super cool it in liquid nitrogen, then you might get .65V. 4.1V would need 8 cells, wired in series. The sketch you posted gave me a headache, it makes no sense. The metal from the top side of 1 cell, gets soldered to the backside of the next cell. And then repeat. Each functional cell, properly soldered in, will add .5V

    And there is the 2nd part, functional. Who certified the cells you paid for, are actually working? 99% of fleabay cells are factory floor sweepings. The good, working ones get sold for market prices, to panel manufacturers, not fleabay. The rejects end up on fleabay, then the buyers of them, end up here. We cant help much when you have bought snake oil from a fancy website.

  3. #33
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    Exclamation Buying cells

    The cells I bought, were directly from the solar panel manufacturer. They ARE NOT 2nds. I never saw any flaws upon examination of each cell. I made a mistake by NOT buying short tabbed. Tabbing SUCKS !!!

    Everyone keeps saying what I KNOW: top of cell one to the bottom of cell 2. What is stumping me is what do you hook up the bottom of cell one to and what do you hook up the top of cell 2 to !

  4. #34
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    just like what i've said to my 1st reply to you, definitely it's 4w(not 4v) with 3Tabs cell.

  5. #35
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    Default out put 4.1 v

    hi trap,i think the volts on your 6x6 cell should be .5 to.65 volts,amps from 3 to 5.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by artie10 View Post
    hi trap,i think the volts on your 6x6 cell should be .5 to.65 volts,amps from 3 to 5.
    Hi Artie - Welcome to Solar Panel Talk!

    Russ

  7. #37
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    Default Missing info.

    Quote Originally Posted by _madtrapper View Post
    The cells I bought, were directly from the solar panel manufacturer. They ARE NOT 2nds. I never saw any flaws upon examination of each cell. I made a mistake by NOT buying short tabbed. Tabbing SUCKS !!!

    Everyone keeps saying what I KNOW: top of cell one to the bottom of cell 2. What is stumping me is what do you hook up the bottom of cell one to and what do you hook up the top of cell 2 to !
    ---
    It's simple. The back of cell one will be your (+) positive, and the front of cell two will be your (-) negative.
    These will hook to your motor, switch, light, whatever you want to power. Know this, I have these 3-tab solar cells that are 6x6 in size they provide .5 volts and when you connect them together you will get about 1v with 2 cells.

    Cell Specifications:
    Rated power : ~3.5 to 4 Wp
    Open circuit voltage: 0.610v -0.621v
    Short circuit current: 8.18 amp - 8.78 amp
    Operating voltage: 0.488 v - 0.50 v
    Operating current: 7.51 amp - 8.14 amp

    current = amps
    volts x amps = watts ---- read the "operating" numbers --- 0.50v x 8.00 amp = about 4 watts


    -- let's say you want to power a small motor -- a 1v motor... (ha)

    I'm not sure what you used to connect cell 1 to cell 2, but most everyone uses the tabbing wire. It is a flat wire with a little solder on it to help you connect it to strips on the top and bottom of solar cells. And EVERYONE uses liquid solder flux before they start.
    Use the solder flux all the way down the front tab lines (silver lines). Then use a 12" section of tab wire and solder it all the way across the silver strip and let 6" hang off one end. Do this to all 3 tab lines - 3 pieces of tabbing wire. This 6" hanging off goes to the back of next solar cell. You would then flux and solder the special tab wire to EACH of the silver areas (tabs) on the back of cell 2. So the tabbing wire goes straight across the front of one cell, then goes to the back of the next cell, and you solder it in a straight line. You have to turn the cells over to get the job done right, just need to be carefull when putting a lot of them together. Most people solder all the wires on the front of each cell, then turn them all over, lay them down as they should, and solder all the wires on the backs.

    To do this job right, you would need about 96" (inches) of small tabbing wire and about 12" of large tabbing wire to connect the ends of this link together. For this small project you could use telephone wire (24 guage) at the ends.... not as your tabbing wire. If you put a lot of cells together, 5 or more, you would need the tabbing wire. Too much current (amps) for little small wires to handle.

    ---- here's the part you are missing -----
    For connecting to your motor, light or whatever device, go ahead and solder 3 more strips of tab wire to the front of cell 1 and let it hang off. Solder 3 more tab wires to the back of cell 2 and let it hang off. Those 3 wires hanging out of each end are connected together, most people solder more tab wire across them to connect these 3 together --- do the same to the other 3 wires at the other end of your linked cells.
    One end of your link of cells is your (+) and the other end of the link is your (-). You can figure it out with your voltmeter. Each end gives you a place to connect more wires to go to your motor or light.

    You asked the right question, I know there are many on here with more knowledge than me. I just think it all got lost in the simpleness of the whole idea of how it really works.

    I'm working on my first solar panel myself. Lot's of great videos on YouTube.

  8. #38
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    Default cells

    Thanks guys
    I think I have a grasp of it thanks to pflash. While most of you were stuck on the voltage issue pflash made it clear enuf fer my thick skull!!??!!(I HATE BRAIN FARTS!)
    As far as my "McGivering" has gone I have most of the cells tabbed (I ONLY BROKE 4!!!!) Next time, I'm buying TABBED !!!!
    It seems that I am only going to get .5 per. I haven't put together yet, HOW, I want them layed out except that I'm gonna parallel all the broken ones.
    Thanks to those of you whom had input.
    Trap

    Quote Originally Posted by pflashy View Post
    ---
    It's simple. The back of cell one will be your (+) positive, and the front of cell two will be your (-) negative.
    These will hook to your motor, switch, light, whatever you want to power. Know this, I have these 3-tab solar cells that are 6x6 in size they provide .5 volts and when you connect them together you will get about 1v with 2 cells.

    Cell Specifications:
    Rated power : ~3.5 to 4 Wp
    Open circuit voltage: 0.610v -0.621v
    Short circuit current: 8.18 amp - 8.78 amp
    Operating voltage: 0.488 v - 0.50 v
    Operating current: 7.51 amp - 8.14 amp

    current = amps
    volts x amps = watts ---- read the "operating" numbers --- 0.50v x 8.00 amp = about 4 watts


    -- let's say you want to power a small motor -- a 1v motor... (ha)

    I'm not sure what you used to connect cell 1 to cell 2, but most everyone uses the tabbing wire. It is a flat wire with a little solder on it to help you connect it to strips on the top and bottom of solar cells. And EVERYONE uses liquid solder flux before they start.
    Use the solder flux all the way down the front tab lines (silver lines). Then use a 12" section of tab wire and solder it all the way across the silver strip and let 6" hang off one end. Do this to all 3 tab lines - 3 pieces of tabbing wire. This 6" hanging off goes to the back of next solar cell. You would then flux and solder the special tab wire to EACH of the silver areas (tabs) on the back of cell 2. So the tabbing wire goes straight across the front of one cell, then goes to the back of the next cell, and you solder it in a straight line. You have to turn the cells over to get the job done right, just need to be carefull when putting a lot of them together. Most people solder all the wires on the front of each cell, then turn them all over, lay them down as they should, and solder all the wires on the backs.

    To do this job right, you would need about 96" (inches) of small tabbing wire and about 12" of large tabbing wire to connect the ends of this link together. For this small project you could use telephone wire (24 guage) at the ends.... not as your tabbing wire. If you put a lot of cells together, 5 or more, you would need the tabbing wire. Too much current (amps) for little small wires to handle.

    ---- here's the part you are missing -----
    For connecting to your motor, light or whatever device, go ahead and solder 3 more strips of tab wire to the front of cell 1 and let it hang off. Solder 3 more tab wires to the back of cell 2 and let it hang off. Those 3 wires hanging out of each end are connected together, most people solder more tab wire across them to connect these 3 together --- do the same to the other 3 wires at the other end of your linked cells.
    One end of your link of cells is your (+) and the other end of the link is your (-). You can figure it out with your voltmeter. Each end gives you a place to connect more wires to go to your motor or light.

    You asked the right question, I know there are many on here with more knowledge than me. I just think it all got lost in the simpleness of the whole idea of how it really works.

    I'm working on my first solar panel myself. Lot's of great videos on YouTube.

  9. #39
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    Default Broken cells

    Quote Originally Posted by _madtrapper View Post
    Thanks guys
    I think I have a grasp of it thanks to pflash. While most of you were stuck on the voltage issue pflash made it clear enuf fer my thick skull!!??!!(I HATE BRAIN FARTS!)
    As far as my "McGivering" has gone I have most of the cells tabbed (I ONLY BROKE 4!!!!) Next time, I'm buying TABBED !!!!
    It seems that I am only going to get .5 per. I haven't put together yet, HOW, I want them layed out except that I'm gonna parallel all the broken ones.
    Thanks to those of you whom had input.
    Trap
    Thanks for the compliment.
    Just to let you know, the broken parts of a cell can still be used, as long as there is a solder tab on the front and back of the piece. You have to be careful because the parts will give you different amps and volts depending on how you put them together. If you laid them out like it was not broken, meaning laid them out like you were going to put it back together, and solder them all together, you will get a lower yield on voltage and amperage than you might expect. You can always experiment with the broken pieces to see what happens.

    If you are going to build anything lasting, you need to seal your cells and their connections with a special sealer that will permanently enclose them and keep oxygen and the elements (water / dirt) from messing with your creation. A cell array (links of cells) exposed to the air for long times will decrease your output over time.

    For the soldering, you need to go to Radio Shack and get a solder iron that isn't over 40 watts. I use a 35 watt myself. You will be best to get a small flat tip - they make them in copper that screw on. A pointed tip is really hard to use. A solder gun will not do.
    This way you can lay the flat tip down and just slowly drag it down the tab as you solder or put on the tabbing wires.

    Again, there are great videos on youtube for all of this.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMCvz...eature=related
    I don't agree with everything she says, but she shows you some great tips on soldering.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ED91...eature=related
    This is a commercial soldering company - but it shows how the tabbing goes on in series.

    This next guy builds them for sale, not endorsing him, but he builds very sturdy arrays, what he has to say makes a lot of sense. His 3rd part shows the application of the sealer or encapsulation of the array.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UxO...eature=related

  10. #40
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    Cool ready to proceede

    Now I have to figure out what config will give me the best results. As it stands, I have 12 cells to work with with one spare. What config will give me max Volts and amps. I would like to be able to run small motors and or circuts (radio) for now.
    Any help & suggestions are appreciated.
    Trap

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