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Thread: Netbook batteries

  1. #1
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    Default Netbook batteries

    I bought a ASUS netbook from Newegg for $289. Also added extra 1 mb of ram, not sure that did anything. I use it for my weather station server. I didn't want to leave a desktop on 24/7. After 300 hrs, my avg power consumption is 9.5 watt/hr. I keep it in the basement, w/the top closed. I use realVNC to access the desktop. Any guesses as to putting it on a timer, and say letting it run on battery for 6 hrs and change for six hours? Would this be a net energy saver or a wash, as to the higher drain when charging the batteries? I realize the batteries can only be charged so many times. Would it be better just to keep it plugged in all the time?

  2. #2
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    No leave it plugged in as it will use less power in the long run because batteries charge/discharge cycle are NOT 100% efficient.
    MSEE, PE

  3. #3
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    Lithium ion batteries charging is described by Venkat in his blog
    http://thisweekinbatteries.blogspot....ery-rules.html

    According to him they have the best life when cycled but not deeply.

    He is a researcher at LBNL and has many interesting posts on his blog.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ed2kayak View Post
    I bought a ASUS netbook from Newegg for $289. Also added extra 1 mb of ram, not sure that did anything. I use it for my weather station server. I didn't want to leave a desktop on 24/7. After 300 hrs, my avg power consumption is 9.5 watt/hr. I keep it in the basement, w/the top closed. I use realVNC to access the desktop. Any guesses as to putting it on a timer, and say letting it run on battery for 6 hrs and change for six hours? Would this be a net energy saver or a wash, as to the higher drain when charging the batteries? I realize the batteries can only be charged so many times. Would it be better just to keep it plugged in all the time?
    Well i don't think it's a good idea to leave your batteries plugged in..After all batteries have fixed amount of Charge-Discharge cycle..And keeping battery plugged in always can affect thier durablity..Thanks

  5. #5
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    Russ, thanks for battery blog link. Good Stuff. rimpa001, I was really just thinking, which method uses less energy, not necessarily trying to get the longest life from the battery pack.. I can keep battery in at all times, it will serve as a UPS. Actually UPS are plugged in all the time, and they have to be replaced at some point.

  6. #6

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    Power consumed battery in vs battery out:
    * Your AC adapter will use power even when your netbook is off.
    * Your computer will use a little energy without a battery installed when off.
    * Your computer will use more engergy with the battery installed due to recharging/maintaining.

    However if the underlying motive is saving money, you will save substantially by practicing proper battery usage. Save a few pennies with battery in vs battery out or save a hundred or so $$ with replacement. And you will enjoy your netbook more for a longer lasting battery

    Most everyone experiences the useful life of a computer battery to be a year or two thinking it's their maximum. Computer stores use that ignorance to sell extended warranties. (I got in a heated argument in a store once about this and angerly walked out without the notebook I was prepared to buy)

    Ed if your idea is to save the environment vs saving money, a dead lithium-ion battery in a landfill can't be good.

    The idea of a netbook is portability. If you use battery power frequently (Everyday or every few days) charge it up to 100% then let it drain to about 80% and remove the battery.

    If your netbook stays on your table top and battery power is rarely used:

    * Charge it to about 80% and remove the battery.
    * Once every 1-2 weeks put it back in and use it to around 50%.
    * Charge to 100% then drain back to 80% and remove it.
    * About once every couple months drain it until the netbook goes into hybernation, then charge to 100%, drain to 80% and remove it.

    If you anticipate needing a lot of battery power in a day or so and access to a plug is unlikely, then exercise it before hand.
    * Drain to about 50%, charge to 100% then let it sit unused for a few hours, drain to 50% then charge to 100% let it sit ..... cycle that about 3x for maximum battery life.

    That seems like a lot of work but my simple description reads overly complicated here (sorry) and it can become routine.

    I used to travel with a group on a charter bus, about 10hr ride. Everyone had fancy newer laptops while mine was 5-6 years old. They, like everyone else kept the battery in and plugged in. I practiced the method above.
    Theirs began to hybernate only after 20 minutes and all others were dead after one hour.
    Mine was still going after 4 hours before I shut it down around 10%. I had a lot of comments about it as my older notebook grew a sort of comical reputation. An "Eveready" bunny thing.

    I've had a tiny Acer One netbook for over a year. I use the battery occasionally and it lasts as long as new. I've had Battery Bar installed since new and it reports 97% capacity left.

    Your motives for your OP question isn't clear whether it's to save money or to conserve energy (purely) or both.
    The answer seems clear to me in both cases. Keep it out, keep it healthy and store it at 80% SOC. If you want to conserve as much energy as possible unplug your new ASUS netbook from the wall when not in use.

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